photo of handbrake operation - Mazda MX-6 Forum
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 12-16-16, 17:24 Thread Starter
 
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photo of handbrake operation

From this photo, it is easily seen and understood how the adjuster can rotate, turn the screw, and as a result, make the piston either tighter or looser against the brake pad.

How the cable works to press the piston against the brake pad is not as obvious. Just pressing on the top of the screw with the connector is not going to move the piston further against the brake pad, as the screw is held in place, unless it can be turned. It looks like the cable part will just apply pressure to the top of the screw, but not be able to turn it.

Can someone explain this ?

Also I guess these brake systems would not be called self adjusting ?

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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 12-16-16, 19:02
 
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I don't really understand how it works either. But I think they are self-adjusting, given time. (I could be wrong.)
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 12-17-16, 2:42 Thread Starter
 
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After closely looking at it, I think I understand how it works. The adjuster turns the screw, to make the assembly the correct length. Then the cable part moves the whole assembly when the lever is applied. The concave portion on the round metal enables it to be engaged, or disengaged (like Star Trek !). When disengaged, it does not look like there is anything to move the assembly back away from the brake pad, but maybe that does not matter since there is no pressure being applied anymore.

The screw could rust inside the piston, making it unadjustable. The piston could also rust inside the caliper. These 2 things must cause most of the brake problems.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 12-17-16, 6:22
 
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Makes sense. Basically it's a cam that twists to push the piston.

I think it's the lip of the rubber seal that retracts the piston when disengaged.

I think the screw is what typically rusts. Once a year I remove the cover bolt, squirt oil and brake grease in there, and turn the screw back and forth a bit. But I live in rust zone.
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 12-18-16, 14:27 Thread Starter
 
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If the cover bolt is removed, and lubrication of the adjuster is done, can that also get
into the screw area ? With the seal there at the top of the screw, it doesn't look like the
screw inside the piston will get lubricated.

These rear calipers look pretty easy to repair yourself with a seal repair kit, as long as
the piston and / or screw are not too solidly rusted.
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