IHI RHB5 VJ11 Turbo Rebuild "How-To" - Mazda MX-6 Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 7-25-04, 19:29 Thread Starter
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IHI RHB5 VJ11 Turbo Rebuild "How-To"

PLEASE DO NOT POST ANYTHING IN THIS THREAD!!!!!!

How to tell if your turbo is blown-Click Me after you've read the rebuild thread



1. Floating Bearings
2. Retaining Clips
3. Mating Ring
4. Thrust Bearing
5. Screws
6. Piston
7. Inner Piston Ring or compressor oil seal
8. Outer Piston Ring or compressor oil seal
9. Seal Plate
10. Screws
11. Compressor Nut
12. Turbine Oil Seal






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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-15-04, 21:44 Thread Starter
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First, you're going to need a rebuild kit which consists of 2 piston seals, 1 piston, 2 bearings, 3 retaining clips, 1 turbine oil seal, 1 thrust bearing, 1 mating ring, allen wrench screws for the thrust bearing and seal plate, 1 compressor nut and an oil seal gasket for the oil return line.

I bought my rebuild kit from TURBOCITY- http://www.turbocity.com

They do great work and strive for a day turnover, try getting that anywhere else.

TurboCity charges $35 to balance your shaft and wheel and $128 for a rebuild kit, you're looking for rebuild kit # 310-700



Here is a picture of what you actually get in a rebuild kit from TurboCity, my old bearings/seals are on the left amd the new kit is on the right.






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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-15-04, 21:45 Thread Starter
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The most important thing in rebuilding a turbo that will last, besides a proper balance with good componants, is quality re-usable parts.

I am speaking specifically about the turbine ring lands located at the backside of the the exhaust wheel.

The ring lands can round themselves off and cause the backside of the shaft not to seat properly.

This is an example of a good condition shaft with good ring lands:






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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-15-04, 23:04 Thread Starter
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TurboCity will bead/sand blast your componants, included in the $35 balancing charge...not bad at all.






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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-15-04, 23:13 Thread Starter
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As you can see, the actual balance markings are pretty primative (an ordinary sharpie) the difference between spinning the shaft to balance and simply marking your shaft and wheel before removal can be quite different.

I had a good condition shaft in a turbo that never gave me any problems, but when it came to balancing, the turbine was so far out of spec (while appearing fine) that it couldnt be balanced. I know that they werent BS'ing me because they gave me a new turbine shaft for free and gave me my old one back to use as a paper weight






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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-15-04, 23:15 Thread Starter
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Next you're going to have to have a clean, crack free center section.



You're going to be working with the 12pm and 6 pm reference points as seen in the picture.

If you look inside the center section, you can see the slots that hold the bearing retainer clips. There are 3 slots inside the center section, one in the front that the front bearing rests on, 1 in the inside towards the rear that holds the rear bearing, and one at the very back that holds the rear bearing in place. The front bearing rests on a retainer clip and is held in place by the thrust bearings pilot.

When installing the retainer clips, you can install the inside(middle) retainer clip and the front clip because the bearings will rest on them rather than be stuck inside, it is only when you install the rear retainer clip that the rear bearing will be permanently in place (unless you take it out) and the front bearing will be permanently in place when you install the thrust bearing.

It is very important that when you install the retaining clips, that the split section (for use with snap ring pliers) is at 6pm this will allow for oil drainage.




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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 11:33 Thread Starter
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Now that you have the center and front retainer clips installed, you can put in the front bearing as seen in the picture, followed by the thrust bearing pilot, followed by the thrust bearing itself:



Thrust pilot:



Thrust bearing:





Keeping the 12 and 6 reference points, the thrust bearing must be installed with the flat section at 6pm. This allows for proper lubrication and oil drainage.






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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 11:56 Thread Starter
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Now you can install the inner and outer oil seals on the piston and install the piston assembly in the seal plate. Make sure you throw a scoche of oil on the piston and oil seals.



Piston installed in the backside of the seal plate:



VERY IMPORTANT, make sure that the smiley face on the backside of the seal plate is lined up with the smiley face on the center cartridge, If you can think of a better word than "smiley face" then let me know


I used a scoche of red RTV around the outside of the seal plate.




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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 12:19 Thread Starter
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Now that you have the front section done, you can move onto the back.



This will be your final snap ring, one in the front holding the front bearing, one in the middle holding the rear bearing, and one on the outside of the rear bearing as seen in the picture.

Now you can install the heat shield and the turbine/exhaust wheel and shaft.





When you install the turbine shaft, you'll find that it won't go in all the way.

This is due to the turbine oil seal which must compress in order to seat itself properly. Carefully push the turbine untill you feel and hear it audibly "pop" and you'll notice that it it sits, feels, and looks better. You also won't be able to easily pull the shaft out when you could before.




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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 12:34 Thread Starter
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Now you can hold the turbine with one hand while you install the compressor wheel and compressor nut. You'll need to line up the balance marks and hold the turbine wheel tightly while you install the compressor nut, remember it's reversed thread in 8mm:



When you have everything installed, it's time to pre oil the bearings inside. You'll want to hold off on installing the oil inlet untill you add oil. I used a 3cc syringe and added it through the oil inlet before installing the oil inlet nipple.
I spun the shaft and wheel multiple times to assure proper lubrication.




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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 12:59 Thread Starter
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NOW, you're at the FUN part aligning the center section in the exhaust housing so it doesnt rub. For one, both parts are cast iron, so they arent going to seat together as nice as other metals would due to them being so rough.

You'll have to gently tap the outter perimeter of the center section, spin the wheel, listen and look at the exhaust wheel in the exhaust housing as it is spins.

If you hear any noise, it isnt correct. Continue tapping and spinning untill you hear NO NOISE AT ALL. If you get frustrated and think "Oh well, it doesnt have to be perfect" think again. If you hear any noise at all, that means that it's rubbing somewhere. If you're spinning it by hand and it's rubbing, imagine what will happen when it's under boost and spinning faster than you ever could by hand....now you see why it has to be perfect.

One way to control the turbine wheel possibly scraping the exhaust housing is to port/clean up the exhaust housing. A die grinder would be easiest, but die grinders can move pretty fast and you can apply a good amount of pressure, especially if you get overzealous.

I'd stick to a dremel just because you're only trying to clean up the imperfections rather than PORT the exhaust housing.




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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 13:24 Thread Starter
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Now you're at the more funnerer part, getting the bolts that hold the L plates back in

If you were the person who took your turbo apart, you'll understand how fun it was to get the two bolts by the coolant inlet and outlet out in the first place.

Let me guess? You had to start unthreading the bolts, then tap the L plates out with a screw driver, then tap the center section from the exhaust side to have enough clearance to take the bolts out the rest of the way because with the center section attached to the exhaust section, the bolts hit the coolant inlet and outlets leaving you thinking "HTF do I get these out?"

If you keep thse bolts, you'll have the same problem putting them back in. You have to start threading the bolts before you put the center cartridge in, move the center cartridge around the L plates and into position....quite the PITA to do

Here is a pictures of what I mean:



Luckily, I have cured this for you




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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 13:36 Thread Starter
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Go to your local auto store and buy 4 M8-1,25 x12mm bolts. Mine are made by Dorman (which is pretty much a standard company when it comes to auto bolts and nuts...you shouldnt have trouble finding them)

M8=Metric 8
1,25=fine thread
and 12mm length

These bolts are just the right size that you can put the center cartridge into the exhaust side, tap the center cartridge and assure that the wheel isnt rubbing, put the L plates down, and tighten without having to think...."HTF do I get these two bolts in?"



As you can see, the length is about two threads shorter (which is all you need) best of all, the bolts only cost $.99 for two instead of a bottle of tylenol for your migraine when trying to reuse the old bolts which are too long.



These bolts have allready been tightened a few threads, but when you first put them in, you have just the right amount of clearance to slip them in without hitting the coolant mounts.




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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 14:05 Thread Starter
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There is a good chance that your copper coolant washers are pretty beat, you might want to buy 4 more to assure you don't get a leak. I looked everywhere and couldnt find copper washers, even Home Depot. I finally found some at Napa:



You might want to also pick up some new manifold to turbo nuts while you're at it. I bought some 13mm brass from Autozone with locking washers. New nuts and bolts are always a good idea since old bolts tend to strip or don't hold tension the way that new nuts and bolts do. Just make sure that you buy the same thread pitch and don't go from a quality nut or bolt to something of lesser quality.






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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 8-16-04, 14:13 Thread Starter
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When you have everything put back together, you should have something that looks similar to this:






Last edited by SixSick6; 2-26-06 at 23:05.
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