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I need to replace pads and rotors. I removed the bottom bolt on the front caliper, and I had been told the caliper could be "rotated up". Didn't work. That baby is not rotating anywhere. So, I noticed a similar bolt on the top of the caliper, and I thought I could just remove it and move the caliper to the side. That top bolt seems welded on there. I moved to the other side, and the same thing: top bolt is REALLY on there.

This is not rocket science -- what am I doing wrong? I've change pads and rotors on Toyotas, Audis (!), and Dodges with no problems.

1. How the heck do you move that caliper?
2. Any trick to removing the rotors?

Thanks.

James
 

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I replaced mine a while ago, almost two years or so. I don't remember everything, but it was relatively straight forward. I do remember one of the bolts being near impossible to get off though. Just keep at it and it should free itself sooner or later.
 

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Chilton's Mazda

When i got my 6 i had to do some serious maintenence and as well as cosmetic and interior problems. i went to kragens and got the Chilton's Mazda book and it really helped. you can get it at autozone. answered all my questions. when i did the brakes i could only do the front ones, the back ones are hard and i'm wayy to lazy to do them. i know how to bleed the brakes and remove the front ones but i dont know how to remove the back ones. i paid my buddy at the shop to do it for me. and he ripped me off because i had a mazda . sucks.
 

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Back ones are easy too. Just a couple more things to do. Instead of retracting the piston with a c-clamp you have to take off a bolt on the back of the caliper and use an allen wrench to withdraw it back. Very simple.

As for the front there is the top bolt that comes out, and then it will slide up (toawards the wheel well) and out (back towards the engine). (its called a floating caliper) If it is rusted to the pads you may want to tap it lightly with a metal hammer or harder with a rubber mallet. Also spray some PB buster on it and it will make it easier. After you do it once you will be able to swap a caliper and brake pads off the rear and bleed the lines in 15 minutes. Its how long it took me last time when it was 20 degrees out and my probes passenger rear caliper locked up. (wait that was last week :D)

About removing the rotor you just have to move the caliper out of the way first (use some wire and wrap it around the caliper to the springs on the strut and that should keep it out of your way) Then you have two 17 mm (i believe) bolts on the back side behind the rotor. Take them off and that piece should come off. Then once again spray some PB buster in the hub/rotor area and hit with a rubber mallet if the rotor wont come directly off.

Good luck and if you have any questions let me know.
Dave
 

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After you do it once you will be able to swap a caliper and brake pads off the rear and bleed the lines in 15 minutes.
Do you have to always bleed the lines after changing the pads?
I ask because I changed mine 2 years ago, and everything was fine. Then a week later i decided that I wasnt satisfied. For some unknown reason, I took it apart again, and redid the same thing (I think it might have been to clean the pads or put in a more trusted brand). After this, the pedal began to travel really low. It still grips like it should, and locks the tires without reaching the floor, which is why I wasnt really worried. But I do have it at the back of my mind. i just know that a pedal shouldnt travel that low. I later replaced the rotors, and still the same thing. I was thinking about bleeding the system, but it seemed like too much work.
 

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You dont have to bleed the lines everytiume you change your brake pads. But only when ever you disconnect a brake line. Although if your brake pedal isnt stiff enoguh then bleed the lines. With a friend helping it should only take about a couple minutes (2-3) if you have the wheel off.
Just losen the bleeder tell him to push the brake and hold, then tighten and tell him to let off the brake. Repeat on all calipers until desired stiffness is reached.
 

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To remove the caliper I seem to remember removing the lower bolt (7mm Allen head) and then it easily rotated upward and pulled it off the caliper pin. Kinda sounds like your pin may be seized or you removed the wrong bolt (did you remove the lower 17mm bolt instead?)? When you reinstall the slide pin use high temp anti-seize. The pads have to slide on that pin so they'll wear evenly.

Jim D
 

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jdonnell said:
To remove the caliper I seem to remember removing the lower bolt (7mm Allen head)
Correct.... you only need a 7mm allen wrench to revome that bolt nothin more...
 

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did u make sure to compress the caliper a little bit before rotating it up? when i did my brakes, the caliper wouldnt rotate up untill i pried the piston in the caliper off the brake pad a little bit, it took less that a mm. only 1 bolt needs to be removed to get to the pads.


if ur talking about removing the whole caliper and bracket so that u can get the rotor off you may have to remove 2 bolts, i know i had to to do the rear rotors.
 

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You dont have to bleed the lines everytiume you change your brake pads. But only when ever you disconnect a brake line. Although if your brake pedal isnt stiff enoguh then bleed the lines. With a friend helping it should only take about a couple minutes (2-3) if you have the wheel off.
I was going to bleed the brakes, but I was concerned about air getting into the system, and thats why I didnt do it. Haynes says to use some bottle bleeder to prevent air from escaping in.
Are u sure your method will prevent air from leaking in? And if so, should I take the cap off the resevoir before doing this?
 

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I always remove The cap first to relieve pressure and bubbling in the reservoir. This way prevents air from coming back in because when your friend presses and holds down to the ground on the brake pedal you tighten the bleeder screw back up to make sure air doesnt come back in when he releases the pedal. Its the way ive always bleed the lines and if you have air in your systm believe me youll know it. The pedal will sink really low to the floor of the car.
 
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