Mazda MX-6 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
27,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Clutch Removal/Installation-My part numbers will be for the GT's

Tools needed: A whole damn box :lol:

This job is alot less painful with an impact wrench.

If you're doing it in a driveway/garage/parking lot (basically any place without a lift) you're going to need some good stuff that you can MAKE WORK.

I used two jackstands, a hydraulic floor jack (as a tranny jack) and a crappy OE trunk/spare tire jack.

You're going to be working mainly on the drivers side, so start removing everything on top. This includes the airbox, throttle body boot, vaf boot, vaf, turbo hoses/piping for the GT's-bypass valve, positive and negative battery cables, negative ground, main fuse wiring, speedometer cable, basically anything in the way.



You obviously want to have a resurfaced flywheel before you start. You have a couple options here, buy one from a member on the boards and have it resurfaced and (lightened if you wish) at a reputable shop, OR you can buy a refurbished flywheel from your local parts store (probably alot less headache going this route)

Kragen/PartsAmerica shows:Standard Flywheels 905 for $45.99 plus $40.00 "core charge" for the GT's

I got mine from MSGT-R for an 18 pack of MGD in bottles:lol: Plus mine as a core :drinkup:

Next you're gonna want a CLUTCH ASSEMBLY which includes the pressure plate, pilot/throwout bearing, centering tool, and clutch disk.

I went with an OE Exedy/Daikin combo from http://www.clutchcityonline.com

$140 for the whole thing, which isnt a bad price considering that the same combo at Mazda costs over $500 and it isnt even a "performance clutch"


Nice setup for the price, and considering that the original lasted 145K and could have/would have lasted a few more miles.



Front and backside of pressure plate



Anytime that you are going to be underneath a motor and messing with things like motor mounts, it's always a good idea to brace it from above as well as underneath. A good friend of mine in highschool died because he went to a junkyard by himself and tried to pull a motor, it fell on him and needless to say he spent a few weeks in ICU before he finally passed:sigh:

Not that this 2x4 is the greatest idea :lol: But when we were pulling the transmission, the hydraulic jack underneath DID slip and the 2x4's saved it from coming all the way down. Well, the 2x4's AND the passenger side motor mount....but you get the idea.

This is that pesky speedo cable and driven gear that always seems to not want to budgewhen you need it to :damnmad:

The speedo cable unscrews but you can leave the driven gear in, untill you are ready to add new fluid.

I highly recommend Valvoline 80-90 Synthetic, it costs less than the $8.99 a quart R:lol:yal Purple that I had in, and is basically the same except it is BRIGHT YELL:wave:W....betcha thought the Lakers would win ehhh?:flamer:

Anyways, onto the starter, it must also be removed.

But first you need to remove the intake manifold bracket

Now is also a good time to loosen the lower transmission mount, two 17mm bolts on the outside that go through the transaxle case and mate with a thin bracket on the other side, and one 17mm nut on the inside that is attached to the center bolt in the mount itself.

While you're underneath, you're going to want to remove the shift linkage and probably should replace the shifter bushings while you're at it (part numbers are listed on the site via search option and you can get everything for around $30 from the dealership)

One thing to remember when changing the shift linkage is that the bolt that connects the shift linkage to the transaxle is threaded with a non threaded section in the middle of the bolt (what does this mean you ask?)

Well, the shift linkage bracket that the bolt slips through has thread on both sides. So when you remove the nut and try to pull the bolt out, it won't budge untill you reverse it out with a socket. When you get the threads out, you'll try to pull it out again and won't be able to, it will reach the top section where it must be reversed once again.

This little feature assures that the bolt never slips out entirely and you don't lose your shift linkage while in the drivers seat at 120mph when your diamond floor mats are flying out the window.

Moving along, you have a whole new animal to conquer "THE WHEEL HUBS"

This is where having an impact wrench really comes in handy. You'll need a 32mm socket, and since it is on with 160-180FPT, you're going to need some muscle if you don't have an impact wrench.

You're also going to want to remove you drivers side endlink, strut section, brake caliper (hang on the splash guard holes with a few twist ties) ball joint and tie rod end.

The strut section is 17mm bolts and nuts, the ball joint bolt is 12 or 14mm? And you'll need some type of wedge to spread the bracket while you raise it off the ball joint.

You'll need a tie rod seperator for the tie rod, available for rent at Autozone.

Make sure you align it correctly, and it'll come off with a few turns.

Once you get the wheel hubs off, you can start concentrating on the front and rear motor mounts as well as loosening all of the transaxles bolts (19mm's) and removing both axles.

Once you have the bolts all loosened and removed (with the exception of the two top bolts) you can take brace the motor and underside of the transmission in preparation for removing the front and rear tranny mounts.
Once you get the tranny mounts out and the transaxle is secured, remove the two top bolts and start the process of seperating the transaxle from the block. It helps if you have a few hands for help at this point, any uneven movement is going to cause it to shift and make it harder to seperate at some points, and easier at others.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
27,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Now you are at the point of giving the outside a good cleaning, cleaning the inside of the bellhousing of contaminated dirty grease which can ruin the throwout bearing, fixing that shift fork you've needed to fix, re-sealing the two halves so fluid won't leak, or installing that LSD that's been sitting under your bed collecting dust.





Pressure plate and clutch assembly ready to come out.


As you can see, there is alot to work around.


This is as high as I lifted my car. And it worked fine for transaxle removal.


145K disk



I wonder why it was slipping?



Still, not too shaby for 145K, and considering a leaking rear mains seal as well.



Flywheel ready to come out, an impact wrench is your friend on this one.



Always start with a resurfaced flywheel beforehand.



Ahhhhh, the rear main seal and pilot bearing. You'll need a slide hammer to remove the pilot bearing and should have bought an OE rear main seal before starting the clutch, they are relatively cheap at Mazda.



If you've gotten THIS FAR......It's Miller Time....who cares if it's only 10am :lol:

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
27,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Use SST's (special service tools) for the axle input section if you are going to be moving the tranny around. I used two pieces of wooden dowel rod to hold the spider gear in place as shown in the picture.



Nice and clean so it won't slip out of your hands, and, it's always nice to clean things before you put them back in.



Now is a good time to refurbish your axles.
http://www.mx6.com/forums/showthread.php?t=98744



Remove the rear main seal, pilot bearing, metal plate behind the flywheel and clean well with brake cleaner. You won't be replacing the gasket behind the rear main seal bracket unless you also plan on removing and re-sealing the oil pan as well, notice that there are two 10mm bolts from the oil pan into the bracket itself.



I wonder why the seal was leaking?



Ahhh, a brand new seal.



Rear main seal and pilot bearing installed.

When you install the rear main seal, you should use some permatex super sealant. It isnt an RTV thick type sealant, rather a thin water like sealant for making paper thin gaskets. It comes in a can with a brush and looks similar to a rubber cement container. You want to put a SMALL amount around the outside diameter of the seal and a a small around of grease on the inside diameter of the seal.



Pressure plate and disk installed and ready for transaxle.



Throwout bearing installed.



Installation is the opposite of removal, you don't HAVE to do it the way I did it. There are plenty of options as far as WHAT to take off, I chose to take everything that I could, but that doesnt mean that you have to as well.



Ahhhh, now it's looking better and almost ready to be fired up.



Make sure that you break the clutch in before going crazy on it, otherwise you'll be doing it again. :damnmad:
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
SixSick6 said:
You're going to be working mainly on the passsenger side
Driver side you mean.

Also, you skipped the section on removing the driver side crossmember, unless you have that elusive "Tranny Shinker" SST.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
27,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
FlySwat said:
Driver side you mean.
It was 2:30 am when I was writing that:cheese:

FlySwat said:
Also, you skipped the section on removing the driver side crossmember
Ya know, I thought about that too. I kept thinking to remember to add in that the crossmember comes out as a whole assembly and never wrote it in there. :lol:

FlySwat said:
unless you have that elusive "Tranny Shinker" SST.
Is that anything like a "Tranny Shrinker"?
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
No No...the tranny shrinker is for helping certian gender confused people fit in :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Pilot bearing removal

With limited space, it's easier to use the "packing" method, rather than a slide hammer.

Simply use a heavy grease, or wet toilet paper. Pack it tightly behind the pilot bearing and into the little hole. Find a properly sized dowel and smack it. You will be repacking quite a bit with the toilet paper, but its less clean up.

-Andrew
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top