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Discussion Starter #21
Kerosene engine flush...Step by step...

1. Drain oil except one quart, or you can drain all the oil and add one quart of new oil. (Starting with a NEW oil filter is recommended).
2. Add the remainder as kerosene, approx. 3 quarts.
3. Start the engine. DO NOT REV THE ENGINE
4. Let it run until warm, not HOT, just warm. About 5-10 mins.
5. Drain the entire contents, during or just after you can continuously pour kerosene into the engine until it comes out clear...
6. Add one quart oil, 3 quarts kerosene.
7. Run the engine again until slightly warmer. DO NOT REV THE ENGINE
8. Drain the entire system.
9. Again if you think it requires, you can pour Kerosene into the NON-running engine as it drains out until it comes out clear.
10. Pour about one quart of oil and let it run out of the oil pan.
11. Add your favourite oil/oil filter.(replace oil pan plug...)
12. Run engine until it’s at operating temperature. Check to make sure it is running ok.
13. Optional...You can drain the system one last time and add new oil filter and oil...

This does a great job...

The residue that comes out should be quite black and a thin liquid...Chunks or sludge should be dissolved...


Flushing engine with kerosene gives very good results. Engine oil flush additives are basically kerosene too, put them in a glass bottle and compare..

However, there is one exception for the engine flush: high mileage cars. In an old engine you really don't want to remove all the deposits. Some of these deposits help seal rings, lifters and even some of the flanges between the heads, covers, pan and the block, where the gaskets are thin. I have heard of engines with over 180000 miles that worked fine, but when flushed it failed in a month because the blow-by past the scraper ring (now really clean) contaminated the oil and screwed the rod bearings. So having said that …

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for the out come of this procedure... do so at your own risk.. IE you decide if your car is of insufficient mileage to expect a good result..
 

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This is for resetting the ECU just incase...
1. Disconnect the Negative battery terminal.

2. Press and hold the brake pedal for 30 seconds or so.

3. Reconnect the Negative terminal.

4. Start the car and let it idle for a few minutes.

5. Your ready to go.
 

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Common Problems and solutions

The following is a list of common problems with the MX6 and Probe 2nd generation. The way I have attempted to set this is up as either by problem, or a particular item.



To make using this post easier, you can use the search function of your internet browser. You can do this by holding down the ctrl key and then pressing the f key. This will bring up a small box that you can insert a word, or phrase and it will search. Try searching for the exactly problem first, in one-word searches. If that fails, try various words that describe the problem.

**
I did not write this so it would become cluttered with questions, essentially becoming difficult to read through. Please DO NOT POST questions in this thread. They are less likely to be answered in this thread than in non sticky threads. This site has the proper forums for each type of question, something that makes using this site very easy. If you would like to add information, simply follow the format so it will not be confusing.**



Also, please keep in mind I have a V6, so if some of the I4 information is incorrect please personal message me, or email me and I will add it and or change it.



If you failed to find it here, it could also possibly be at one of the two following locations:


If I used an unknown acronym, please refer to the following link, as it will most likely be located there.

· http://www.mx6.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=62360

 

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Shaking

General tip-Always work inward, look for any leaks from suspension or axle assembly parts.
  • Shocks-If the shocks of a car are not functionally properly, the vehicle will respond poorly to bumps and to turns, causing the car to vibrate. This can only be fixed by replacing the shocks.
  • Tires-Tires can be either misbalanced, or the tread may be worn out or warped causing a lope in the car’s ride, and will be considerably more noticeable at higher speeds. Also be sure to check the lug nuts are tightly secured.
  • Engine and transmission mounts – The transmission and engine’s rotation causes the motor to shake, so the motor/transmission mounts are used to vanquish the vibrations. But if a mount it shot, the vibrations are sent straight to the chassy. This can only be fixed by replacing, but you are left with the options such as polyurethane or aftermarket mounts as to the oem.
  • Axle assemblies-CV joints, c rings, and CV boot
  • Wheel alignment- If the alignment of the wheel is off, the car will pull in different directions at different times which will result in shaking, which will be more noticeable at higher speeds. To cure this, take the vehicle to a local tire shop and ask them to balance the wheels. Will normally range from 20-30 dollars USD.
  • Rotors-If a rotor is warped, a caliper may press into them causing to brake on that side only, creating a pulling to either the left or right.
  • C Rings-These rings keep the CV joint and boot in place, and if it is broken it would allow the CV joint to come out of place and to slide around. This can only be fixed by replacing.
  • Half shafts (CV Boot)-A rubber piece that can either crank or tear. Usually to do with CV joints sliding around on them. This can only be fixed by replacing.
  • CV joints-Only if the shaking occurs during acceleration, especially corners. To test this come to a complete stop and turn the wheel as much as possible to one side, then slightly back to avoid overheating the power steering pump, and accelerate. The acceleration does not have to be hard. Do this for both sides. If you hear a clicking then your CV is most likely the problem.
  • Damaged rim- A rim with a slight flaw, or the rims weighing different amounts could cause the entire car to shake, and will be more noticeable at higher speeds. This can only be fixed by having the rim repaired or by replacing it.
  • Tie Rods- To test this raise your front end up, and lower it onto jack stands placed underneath some portion of your control arms. Then, place your hands at 10 and 4 o'clock and move the wheel back and forth (laterally). Then perform this at 7 and 1 o’clock. If it will wiggle, have a friend feel along your tie rod to figure out if it's your inner or outer end that's got the play.
  • Ball Joints- Ball joints are high pressure grease packed bearings. Eventually the bearings become loose so the pegs protruding from them attaching to the rest of the suspension can then move freely. This can only be fixed by replacing the joints. It is typically easier to replace the entire control arm.
 

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Raising / dropping rpm in gear

  • Clutch-If the clutch is slipping while engaged the engine load will decrease, causing the engine rpm’s to increase. If the clutch slips while disengaged the car will be placed in gear, forcing the car rpms to raise to the gear. This can only be solved by replacing the clutch.
  • Flywheel-This is not a consistent problem. If the flywheel becomes over heating the engine will be unable to maintain it’s rpm’s.
  • Distributor or Ignition-By far the most common failure, this is slightly harder to check for failure. To check the distributor you must remove it, using an ohmmeter touch the probes to the primary terminals of the coil, measure the primary resistance and it should measure up as follows:
93 and 94 models .6 to .11 ohms

95 and up models .4 to .73 ohms

Then touch the probes to the secondary terminal and the positive terminal, measure the resistance and it should measure as follows:

93 and 94 models 11.5 to 18.5 K-ohms

95 and up models 20 to 31 K-ohms

Both of these readings are designed for 70 degrees coils, so some variance will come into play based on coil temperature. If the coil fails this check, replace it.

  • Spark Plugs-The spark plugs could be worn out, therefore causing the engine to miss fires and perform poorly. Visually inspect and replace if necessary.
  • Spark Plug Wires-The spark plug wires can also wear out, though uncommonly tested they should read around 5000 ohms of resistance per foot (oem).
  • Crankshaft sensor(s)-This determines the timing for the fuel and ignition on each cylinder as well as the engine rpm. Failure should throw an engine code, but not always. Depending on the years, there are either on or two sensors.
To check the distributor mounted sensor remove the distributor, but place the larger of the two connectors, and using a voltmeter probe the sensor terminal (if I remember correctly it’s inside the distributor housing or cap). Then rotate the distributor shaft by hand one full turn and note the voltmeter reading. For a 4 cylinder, four volt pulses should occur and 6 pulses on the 6 cylinder. If this is not true, replace the sensor.

This only applies to the 96 and 96 (OBDII) models I believe. To check the motor mounted sensor (located to the left of the air conditioner pulley) measure the gap between the sensor and its trigger wheel on the crankshaft. It should be between .02 to .059 inches thick. The gap is not adjustable; if this does not match replace the sensor (if the vehicle has a detachable bracket, replace this instead). Next, disconnect the electrical connecter at the sensor and probe terminals A and B (first two on the left) with an ohmmeter. Resistance should be between 520 and 580 ohms. If the reading is incorrect, replace the sensor.

  • Engine coolant-Being low in engine coolant can cause this as well, or at least it comes up many times in threads.
 

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Long Starts or wont start
  • Fuel filter-Check the fuel filter to ensure that is it not clogged or providing any problem that could cause a fuel delivery failure.
  • Injectors-Check the injectors by placing one end of an hose as close to the nozzle as you can, and the other at your ear. You will not hear a clicking if the injectors are malfunctioning or not working at all. You can also run fuel injector cleaner to reassure a clean system.
  • Fuel Pump-The most common problem is a pressure leak in the fuel lines. To avoid this, turn the key to the “on” position and wait a few moments. This will engage the fuel pump, which will pressurize the lines. The car should start normally at this point.
  • Battery Terminals-Check that the terminals are clean and have no corrosion or anything that could possibly reduce the flow of current.
  • Random Things- Check the operation of the gear position switch (atx) or the clutch start circuit (mtx). Check the starter interrupt relay, it is located in the fuse box of the engine compartment. When shut off the car’s fuel pressure should not drop below 5psi, if it does you either have a pressure leak or a broken fuel pump or fuel pressure regulator.
  • Starter-To check this, when the motor is about to begin rotation listen to hear a clicking noise. This is the solenoid of the starter engaging into the flywheel. To check the solenoid remove the starter, and place the unit in a secured vise, and clamp it down with the solenoid facing outwards. Then using the car’s battery and jumper cables, place the negative cable on the body of the starter, then the positive terminal on the B+ terminal on the starter. Be careful this will cause the solenoid plunger to engage, and begin rotation at very high rpm’s. Do this for a short amount of time to prevent overheating, or damaging the starter.
  • Ignition System-Go ahead and check the disty and rotor, anything that sends a signal to the distributor/ignition pack.
 

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Running rich
  • Oxygen Sensors-If malfunctioning they will not read the correct mixture of air/fuel in the exhaust, causing the engine to supply more fuel into less air. These generally, but not always throw a code. Most commonly these are just replaced since they are not expensive or generally hard. You can change the sensor from a four wires to a single, and save some money, this is explained here… http://forums.probetalk.com/showthread.php?t=1701054184
Or you can replace it with a four-wire sensor, explained here…

http://forums.probetalk.com/showthread.php?t=57074http://forums.probetalk.com/showthread.php?t=57074



Rough ride
  • Shocks-This is generally the problem, the shocks control how much bounce or play is in a ride. The bouncier it is, the smoother the ride but lacking in handling generally. Replacing these with firmer aftermarket set will give the vehicle more control in cornering and wheel motion. Many aftermarket units allow the adjustment of the comfort level. This allows you to choose whether you would like a rock hard ride, or a soft smooth ride
 

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Low idle
  • Throttle position sensor (TPS)-The TPS control the amount of air entering the throttle body at idle essentially. To adjust this, just go here…
http://www.rs-productions.com/RSP_Motors/tech/tps/tps.htm


To check if the TPS is functioning, disconnect the harness connector and attach the probes of a voltmeter to the REF terminal (+) and the GND terminal (-)(Inner and Outer will cover both), and with the ignition in the “on” position it should read around 5.0 volts. If this is not the case then there is either an open circuit to the PCM or a defective PCM. Next check the TPS signal voltage, take the keys out, and reconnect the harness to the TPS, and back probe the electrical connecter SIG terminal (+) and GND terminal (-) using pins. Be careful not to damage the wiring harness. With the ignition key in the “on” position and the throttle fully closed. Gradually open the throttle valve and observe the TPS signal voltage. The reading should be between 0.5 to 1.0 volts, slowly move the throttle valve and see if there is a change in the voltage values as the sensor travels from idle to full throttle. The voltage should increase smoothly to approximately 3.5 to 5.0 volts. 1993 four cylinder models TPS is a permanent part of the TB, and if out of range the entire throttle body must be replaced.



Leaking break fluid
  • Master Cylinder-This is the container for the brake fluid, there are 3 lines running from it. One to the front left, one to the front right, and one to the rear. Check the front first, they will be harder but it seems more logical that one of them would break first. Inspect the unit and ensure that there are no cracks or any leaking fluid.
  • Calipers and or any rubber fittings- To locate the leak, take the wheels off and look at all of the rubber hoses and connections, and the wheel well. Do this while someone is pressing the brakes to make it easier if you choose. The leak should be visible.
 

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Dead or depressed clutch pedal

  • Clutch flex line-Most commonly the line that feeds the clutch will break or come off. Technically the vehicle will be drivable, but is an extremely dumb choice seeing as the clutch is shared with the brakes. Inspect the line for any tears, if it’s connected or holes, if it’s even there. The line will need to be replaced. You can replace it with a stronger stainless steel aftermarket or a rubber oem one.


Timing and timing mode

The following criteria was posted by Mr. MX6, and he is to be given full credit for it.

  • Timing mode- Insert a jumper pin between the ten and gnd pins.
  • Resetting the timing-Insert a jumper pin between the ten and gnd pins. Hook up the timing light to the battery for power and hook up the signal to the #1 wire location on the disty(make sure all 6 plugs will still get full spark). Loosen the two 12 mm bolts on the disty so it can rotate(not too loose). Now, with the jumper pin inserted, start the car, if it dies, then open the idle air screw on the top of the tb a couple turns. Make sure the car is warmed up, NO accessories or fans or anything is on, and if the idle is like 1500 then close the idle air screw a little, it should be open 2-3 full turns. Now, move the power steering hoses and wires out of the way, point the flashing timing light at the crank pulley, and watch the small tab on it illuminate and reference it's location to the small timing marks on the plastic tab that sticks out over it. Rotate the disty until the notch on the crank pulley is exactly in line with the "10" on the plastic timing mark indicator(this is 10 degrees before top dead center). Now when it's at 10, tighten the disty down carefully so as not to move it. Double check for 10 deg. btdc. Now adjust the idle air screw until your idle sits right at 650 rpms (+/-25). Turn off the car, remove the jumper pin.


Shifter and bushing replacements and parts numbers

 

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Steering pulls to one side under acceleration

  • Tie Rods- To test this raise your front end up, and lower it onto jack stands placed underneath some portion of your control arms. Then, place your hands at 9 and 6 o'clock and move the wheel back and forth (laterally). If it will wiggle, have a friend feel along your tie rod to figure out if it's your inner or outer end that's got the play.
  • Strut mounts, ball joints, wheel bearings, or tie rod ends. Jack the front end up and rest it so that the jack stands are on the control arms. Now, grab a tire with your hands at 12 and 6 and try to shake it as if you're adjusting your camber. If there's play, have someone grab your lower ball joint while doing it, to see if it's moving. If not, have them feel/watch your upper strut mount. Then, move your hands to 10:30 and 4:30, then 7:30 and 1:30and do the same thing. If there's play here, it's your wheel bearing(s). Finally, do 9 and 6 and check out your tie rod ends. Have someone grab the outers first, but don't forget to grab the accordion-type sleeve and feel the inners. (This was taken exactly from Rick, who’s word is generally accepted as law and is not to be argued.)


Water pump

Generally when the water pump goes bad it just leaks coolant (usually under the passenger side of the engine compartment), and in this case the pump will need to be replaced. It’s not a good idea to put this off since it has a major effect on the cooling system of the car. One misconception is that the water pump cannot be replaced without removing the timing belt, but in fact it can be. Some do say it’s easier to just take the belt off. For instructions on replacement, please check the following thread http://www.mx6.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19870
 

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Lower control arm bushing

For a guide as to how to remove and install the lower control arm I am using a post by Mr. MX6, and he is to be given full credit for the following (again)

  • Removal

    The following is a list of the lower control arm‘s related components.

    1 Ball Joint Clamp
    2 Stabilizer Control Link-to-Lower Control Arm
    3 Ball
    4 Rear Bushing
    5 Lower Control
    6 Front Bushing
    7 Front Bushing Dynamic
    8 Stabilizer Control


    1. Raise and support the vehicle.
    2. Remove the front wheels.
    3. Remove the ball joint clamp bolt.
    4. Remove the stabilizer control link-to-control arm nut.
    5. Separate the ball joint stud from the steering knuckle.
    6. Remove the two lower control arm rear bushing bolts.
    7. Remove the lower control arm front bushing bolt.
    8. Remove the lower control arm.


  • Installation

    1. Position the lower control arm against the underbody of the vehicle.
    2. Install the lower control arm rear bushing bolts. Tighten the lower control arm rear bushing bolts to 93-131 N-m (69-96 lb-ft).
    3. Install the lower control arm front bushing bolt. Tighten the lower control arm front bushing bolt to 78-106 N-m (58-78 lb-ft).
    4. Install the ball joint stud into the steering knuckle.
    5. Install the ball joint clamp bolt. Tighten the ball joint clamp bolt to 34-57 N-m (25-42 lb-ft).
    6. Install the stabilizer control link-to-lower control arm nut. Tighten the stabilizer control link-to-lower control arm nut to 36-54 N-m (27-40 lb-ft).
    7. Install the front wheels. Tighten the wheel lug nuts to 88-118 N-m (65-87 lb-ft).
    8. Lower the vehicle.


Alternator

The alternator is a coil located above the compressor that recharges the battery while the car is running, and is more prone to fail when under stress such as a high powered stereo system. There are no production alternators being made that are stronger than stock. Ask a local shop if they can create one, but beware of the high price. Generally the alternator going bad will cause the charge light to come on. If and when it does go bad, the car will only run for the amount of time the battery alone can sustain it, which is usually around 3 miles on a fully charged car, no stereo, no lights. Some gauges will not function in this event.

  • To check the alternator, place the ignition in the “on” position, and check the voltage at the back of the alternator. Be sure that no electrical accessories are running. When the vehicle’s ignition is at the “on” the alternator should read the following:
B and S terminals should read the battery voltage

L terminal should read approximately 1 volt.

 

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Crack on TB elbow

A crack in the throttle body elbow will allow unmeasured air into the system. This will cause the car to run very lean since there will be more air entering the combustion chambers than the fuel amount can handle. This can cause the engine to run poorly when it is warmed up, but should run fine when the car is cold since the car runs in a loop mode, supplying more fuel.



Acceleration hesitation

  • Spark Plugs-Generally a hesitation in acceleration is caused by worn or failed spark plugs, which may not fire under heavy stress.
  • Spark Plug wires-Worn wires can cause a spark failure due to a failure to transmit the electrical current.
  • Fuel filter-Check the fuel filter to ensure that is it not clogged or providing any problem that could cause a fuel delivery failure.
  • Air filter- Check the air filter to ensure that is it not clogged or providing any problem that could cause a shortage of air.


Yellow headlights

  • Sanding technique-Sand the outside of the headlight with 1000 to 2000 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper. Use it wet and rinse often. Be sure to take your time and maintain an even finish on the headlight. Finish with a polish of some sort that will not fog plastic. For detailed directions please visit http://www.mx6.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=20850




Car dies during hard turns

  • Fuel Pump- (Most common diagnose is during hard cornering, especially left, if you're at less than 1/3-1/4 tank) When taking a hard turn the fuel pump is supposed to keep the fuel lines pressurized, but when the unit fails the pressure is lost, which cuts the fuel feed to the motor. Simply replace the fuel pump to solve this.
 

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Power steering

  • If there is a long, almost screech when turning, or the turning becomes very difficult, especially at lower speeds look into the power steering assembly; inspect all of the lines and fitting. Ensure that there are no leaks, and if there are most likely the unit will need to be replaced.


Resetting the ECU

  • To reset the ECU perform the following steps. This will reset all codes if the PCM is throwing a code.
1. Disconnect the negative cable of the battery.

2. Turn on the lights, or press the brakes for 30 seconds to remove any residual power.



Adjusting the hood and hood flapping

  • Under the hood (on the corners of the frame) there is a rubber bumper that has a screw adjustment. Simply turn the screw clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust it up or down as needed so the hood do no longer shakes, or sits too high/low off of the fenders.


Ticking Motor (HLA’s)

  • Most commonly this is the hydraulic lash adjusters that cause the ticking sound when they compress. One of the most common ways to reduce the ticking, and possibly eliminate is to flush the engine. To do this perform the following
1. Drain oil except one quart, or you can drain all the oil and add one quart of new oil. (Starting with a new oil filter is recommended).

2. Add the remainder as kerosene, approx. 3 quarts.

3. Start the engine. Do not rev the engine.

4. Let it run until warm, not hot, just warm. About 5-10 mins.

5. Drain the entire contents, during or just after you can continuously pour kerosene into the engine until it comes out clear.

6. Add one quart oil, 3 quarts kerosene.

7. Run the engine again until slightly warmer. Do not rev the engine.

8. Drain the entire system.

9. Again if you think it requires, you can pour Kerosene into the non-running engine as it drains out until it comes out clear.

10. Pour about one quart of oil and let it run out of the oil pan.

11. Add your favorite oil/oil filter.(replace oil pan plug...)

12. Run engine until it’s at operating temperature. Check to make sure it is running ok.

13. Optional…you can drain the system one last time and add new oil filter and oil…
 

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Heres a thread I was looking for. I read it when I first joined this site. It will answer many questions about the history of ford and mazda. It will make a good read to all those that will ask about the history.

Click this link:
Mazda/Ford History

Its a real good read.
 

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jim5618 said:
My limited knowlege is that when you are not moving there is less air flow cooling the motor and passing through the radiatior. In otherwords the heat stays near the motor.
Yes sir. That big hole in the front of your bumper is to allow air to pass into the engine compartment while you're moving. Obviously when you're not moving, the air just sits there, which is why cars have fans to cool themselves off when idling.
 

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