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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I swear this is the last time I'll mention my brakes. The pads are dragging noisily on front LHS, 95 V6.

I've done the following.

i) Determined that the caliper is retracting and the pads are not.
B. Given everything a damn good cleaning.
3. Applied anit-squeal compound to back of pads.
- Replaced the hardware, inc. anti-rattle springs.
* Replaced the lower caliper guide pin (probably not relevant).

Pepboys tell me that the pads may be glazed, and that I'll need to replace them. Could this be right? The pads are fairly new and were broken in properly (I forget what type they are - nothing fancy, I'm sure).

So, can anyone tell me what causes glazing, what fixes it, and whether this could be the problem?
 
G

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I believe glazing is the metal crystallizing which is caused by too much heat build up that is dissipated too quickly. It's like you are heat treating your rotors. I think it is mostly a problem if is happens during the break in process during which your rotors are more susceptible to glazing (not sure why).

If you did recently buy your pads and resurfaced your rotors, you might get away with simply sanding the pads a bit (just a thin layer) and sand the hell out of the rotors then use that brake clean spray and repeat the break in procedure.

Although, when I replaced my pads adn rotor, I also initially heard a "rumbling" noise from the brakes, which eventually went away. The noise was similar to a huge boulder rolling on rock.
 

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Please give me some detail on break-in procedure

I think I am having the same problem. I cleaned everything too and applied the anti-squeak, but I am still having that damn squeal. I think I might have overdone it just after I replaced the pads and broke fast (I was trying to beat this new Subaru Impreza) I am going to sand the pads and the disks a little. I need to know what the correct break-in procedure is. Please help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'd guess that the break-in procedure depends on the type of pad. I can't even remeber what type mine are.

I'm also guessing that if the pads are glazed, I'll be able to tell from their look/feel?
 

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I could be wrong and someone correct me if I am, but what I remember glazing is from the moisture in the brake pads.
All brake pads have a certain amount of moisture in them when they are new. If you brake too fast or too hard it causes the moisture to rise to the surface too fast on the pads. Once that is done the hot surface then causes the moisture to "glaze over" the pads creating a rather smooth, hardened surface. If you gradually and gently break in your pads the moisture has a longer period of time to dissipate more slowly. The first time I did a pad replacement on my car I didn't realize this and ended up glazing my brakes. The wouldn't brake worth a darm after a few weeks and I couldn't figure out why. I though it was Ford's crappy braking system. A year later I replaced them again and found they were glazed over. I have subsequently broken in my new Metal Master pads properly and they can stop on a dime when warmed up. Of course, having slotted rotors helps out in this area as well.:D
 
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