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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i can't find this anywhere on the site - i need to know what are codes 9 and 11 - thanx to all responses
 

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Must not have looked very hard... Took me 5 seconds....

Here

9) Coolant Temp sensor
10) Intake air temp sensor
 

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Those two codes can also sometimes be thrown when an O2 sensor goes bad. O2 sensor failure is much more common than failure of either of those two.
 

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schwinn said:
Those two codes can also sometimes be thrown when an O2 sensor goes bad. O2 sensor failure is much more common than failure of either of those two.
i dont think so.......

maybe if code 15,17,23 or 24 was present aswell, but i still doubt it.

here are codes 9 and 10 as nakano mentioned but there is no code 11????

Code 9: Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
Sensor Purpose:
This sensor tells the PCME the temperature of the coolant in the engine. The sensor is located on the left (radiator-side) cylinder head near the accessory drives. It has a two-wire connector on it. It should not be confused with another temperature sensor located very close it that has only one wire on it - this is the sender for the instrument cluster temperature gauge.
Fault Description:
This code indicates that the voltage on the CTS is lower than 0.195V (indicating a short circuit to ground) or the reading is over 4.883V indicating the connection from the PCME to the sensor is open. The sensor can be checked with an ohmmeter and should fall within the ranges shown in the table:
Coolant/Sensor Temperature Reading in Ohms Typical Voltage Seen
20oC (68oF) 2200 to 2700 2.38V
80oC (176oF) 290 to 350 530mV
91oC (196oF) 226 to 241 390mV
97oC (207oF) 193 to 205 343mV
108oC (226oF) 145 to 153 258mV
110oC (230oF) 137 to 146 249mV
PCME Fault Control Moding:
When Code 9 is present, the PCME substitutes fixed calibration values for the various representations of engine coolant temperature used internally. The engine may idle roughly and may be hard to start. Timing and fuel delivery calculations will be skewed somewhat since the coolant temperature will be only an approximation. As well, to safeguard against overheating, the PCME will also activate the cooling fan constantly.
Memorization:
This code is memorized in the PCME non-volatile memory.
Things To Check When Diagnosing:
1. Use the above table to check the coolant sensor itself. It is probably the cause of the problem
2. As always, check the connector to make sure there's no corrosion or grease or dirt in it.
3. Disconnect the sensor and check the R/DG wire for +5V with the ignition on. If it is absent, check the wiring to the PCME and the PCME itself.


Code 10: Intake Air Temperature Sensor
Sensor Purpose:
This sensor tells the PCME the temperature of the air entering the engine. This information is used to adjust the amount of fuel delivered and is also used to adjust the amount of spark timing. The IAT sensor is located embedded inside the Volume Airflow Sensor housing and is not itself replaceable although a substitute part may be used (see below) since if the IAT goes, it amounts to replacing a $1000CDN part for a $0.39 thermistor. The fix may not be pretty but it's cheap. However, the IAT is a robust part and is not likely to fail - ever.
Fault Description:
This code indicates that the voltage on the IAT A/D channel is lower than 0.136V (indicating a short circuit to ground) or the reading is over 4.844V indicating the connection from the PCME to the sensor is open. The sensor can be checked with an ohmmeter and should fall within the ranges shown in the table:
IAT Sensor/Intake Air Temperature Reading in Ohms
-20oC (-4oF) 10000 to 20000
20oC (68oF) 2000 to 3000
60oC (140oF) 400 to 700
PCME Fault Control Moding:
When Code 10 is present, the PCME substitutes fixed calibration values for the various representations of intake air temperature used internally. The engine may idle roughly and may be hard to start. Timing and fuel delivery calculations will be skewed somewhat since the air temperature will be only an approximation.
Memorization:
This code is memorized in the PCME non-volatile memory.
Things To Check When Diagnosing:
1. Use the above table to check the intake sensor itself. It is probably the cause of the problem
2. As always, check the connector to make sure there's no corrosion or grease or dirt in it.
3. Disconnect the sensor harness at the VAF (go there to see what each pin is for) and check the BK/R wire for +5V with the ignition on. If it is absent, check the wiring to the PCME and the PCME itself.
If the sensor itself is bad, don't despair. Contact Digi-Key and order up an NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient) thermistor part number KC017N-ND. This thermistor has a similar characteristic to the OEM part in the VAF near ambient temperatures though it does veer off the OEM characteristic once temperatures begin to get high or low. The car will run quite acceptably with this thermister as a VAF but you might find it runs rich when cold (like below freezing cold). The other problem is that because the thermister reads abnormally high on the "hot" side, the PCM might perceive that the air is hotter than it really is, causing slightly lean conditions during throttle transitions and more importantly, it might start removing spark timing. You decide... I eventually recalibrated my PCM to use the new sensor since I run it with my MAF setup. Clearly, this is not an option to the average Prober.
It is up to you to mount this device and splice it into the IAT wiring. On my MAF conversion, the VAF (and therefore the IAT) was removed from the car completely. I went to a wrecking yard and found the MAT (Manifold Air Temperature Sensor) from a 1988 Cavalier Z24, removed the sensing element and soldered in the Digi-Key part above. I then mounted this in the Hotshot cold-air tube and spliced the harness into the Probe's IAT wiring. This is not hard to do and will save you a bundle.
The other, better IMHO, solution is to purchase the engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor for a GT Probe and use that as your IAT. It has virtually the same characteristic as the in-VAF unit of the GT. The problems with this one is that (a) you'll need to get the connector for the ECT from a wrecked PGT to use it and (b) the body of the ECT is brass so it may pick up ambient temperatures (e.g. the temp of the Hotshot tube instead of the air passing through it.) Still, to me, this is easily the preferable solution to the Digi-Key part.
 

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Aussomea said:
i dont think so.......
I can only speak from experience. I have had many issues with Autozone (Bosch) O2 sensors on my MX6. During the 4 or so O2 sensors I replaced, I threw mostly the O2 codes. However, there was at least one time that the intake air temp sensor lit up on me, and maybe even the coolant temp sensor.

Also, consdering the majority of people here post about O2 sensors more than either of the other two, I can only suggest taking a look at the O2s, instead of the very expensive air-temp sensor.
 

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clear your codes first and then check them a few days later...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i've already changed the o2 sensors and whatnot - and have cleared the codes and have had these pop-up on me - thanx alot for the replies
 
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