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Cylinder Sleeving is a trick thats been around forever (Though I'm sure SleepCounter was born before it). It is usually used when a motor has already been bored out so much that a rebore will weaken the cylinder walls, so they insert a sleeve and go with a smaller bore piston.
 

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well they also resleeve a block, casue the original material of the blokc might not be the best material for high performance, and if u add alot of power to it, u might melt the walls, so that y they put in better more heat handling sleaves, so u can go high performance on your engine, they have alot of kits for hondas, if u wanna go all ou on the engine, like turbo+ nitrous, and have a 500hp car.
 

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Think!

Mazda_MX6_Turbo said:
if u add alot of power to it, u might melt the walls
Don't tell me, let me guess. U wear a baseball cap with the peak to the rear, right?

Melting point of your (aluminum) pistons is about 900°C (1600°F) lower than your cast iron block. Your pistons would be vapourized before the cylinder walls even broke out a sweat.

Yah, right. Melt the walls.

SixSick6 said:
SleepCounter, Flyswat says you are "3 years older than dirt"
I was there when they invented motocross -- I don't think there was dirt before then.
 

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FlySwat said:
Cylinder Sleeving is a trick thats been around forever (Though I'm sure SleepCounter was born before it).
I resemble that remark!

FlySwat said:
It is usually used when a motor has already been bored out so much that a rebore will weaken the cylinder walls, so they insert a sleeve and go with a smaller bore piston.
Additionally (and more often, in my experience) used in aluminum blocks with cast-in sleeves (sound like any hondas you know?) when they break through part of the (cast-in) sleeve when trying to overbore. The cast-in sleeves are ribbed on the outside (to hold then solid when the block is cast around them) and I've seen them expose aluminum between the ribs as early as .010" overbore.

One of the things they might be good for (in the F2T world) is containing compression better than o-ringing the block or the head. The sleeves typically have a ridge around the top end which sits in a recess cut into the block. If you cut the recess maybe .006 shallower than the ridge, the sleeve will project above the deck and you have that much higher unit pressure containing compression (and that much lower where the water/oil passages are).
 
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