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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past weekend I replaced a wheel cylender on my 89 Ford Probe GL. I put everything back together refilled my brake fluid and bled all 4 brakes, making sure that the entire time my fluid never got low in the master cylender. No matter what I do and how i bleed, my brakes are soft and squisy... please help.

The way I bled the brakes was have a partner pump the brake pedal 4 or 5 times than holding it down while I opened the bleeder screw for about 1 full second than closed it and repeat.. I did this several times each brake until the stream of fluid squirting out of my tubing was a solid stream wiht no gaps
 

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You will find that it is extremely hard to get air out of the brake system on these cars. It will take hours of pumping and bleeding the manual way to get it right.

Make sure when you're bleeding the brakes that you use a piece of clear vinyl tubing and some sort of jar to put the end of the tubing into to prevent air from entering the system. This also makes it easier to see the air bubbles coming out of the system. Many parts stores sell a brake bleeder kit that includes all of this stuff.

If you've bled for hours and still no luck, I would recommend you take the car to a shop that has an air operated power bleeder as it will save lots of time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
follow up

ok I went back out and bled the brakes THOUROUGHLY making sure I bled 5 times wihtout seeing so much as ONE bubble. I did this on all 4 brakes. My brakes have some pressure and the car is now definately driveable. I can consistantly stop on a dime if i need to, however the feeling of my brakes have DEFINATELY changed. I still have stiffness and pressure but they feel a little looser, they have a little more freeplay (the distance it takes for me to push the pedal and start to feel resistance.) this SAME exact thing happened months ago when I bled my clutch. Is this normal that the feeling changes when you mess with the system?

Also.. when I hit the brakes HARD in snow or high speeds, the rear passenger side of my car hooks out quite dramatically(enough to. when I took my brakes apart I seen that the rear passenger wheel cylinder was bad and assumed thats why that happened. Now that its all fixed this still happens... anyone have any ideas for me
 

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I had the same problem with my 89 GL. I replaced both slave cylinders in the rear and the master cylinder. Bled three times using a vacuum bleeder at each wheel. Still not as hard and firm as my 89 GT. I went through two rebuilt master cylinders and finally bought a new one. Still not as good as new. Maybe the quality control on master cylinders is not as good as it should be.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
power bleed

I have never heard of "power bleeding" could someone who knows elaborate for me
 

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Power Bleeder

A setup that uses air pressure to compress the brake fluid and move it through the brake lines. You can make one yourself or you can buy one for about $70. Most mechanics have a heavy-duty version that works well.

here is a pictorial of what a homemade one might look like.
 

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Baffles my mind as well. I have not had those problems, but it sounds like I do things a tad differently.

When I bleed my brakes, I pump the pedal only once then release the end of the hose to let the fluid out and closing the end back up just prior to the line loosing pressure from the pedal pump. Then slowly return the pedal to resting position, press the pedal slightly down, open the end, press the pedal, close the end...... blah blah ... You get it right. I don't know if the slight difference in procedures might have any effect on your performance though. I also did the rear disc conversion after the first time I saw the heavy and tacky drums and all that was involved with them.. Gotta be a pain dealin with those. I don't miss em. Slave cylinders leak (sometimes you can't see it). Drums are ugly. Drums are heavy. Shoes are a pain in the a$s compared to caliper pads.

Oh.. And another little aftermarket peice I invested in (yet often forget to mention) are my Speed Bleed bleeding screws

I originally had that problem when I first bled my clutch as well, but after some inspection, I found that the slave cylinder was leaking inside the boot. Replaced it and had no mo problem.

As for power bleeding. It's a system pro shops use for quick and accurate system bleeds. They attach some do-hiccky to the Master cylinder and the other part of the do-hicky to the brake(s) being bled. They turn on the electric or pneumatic pump and it cylces through completely purging the system of air and pressurizing it at the same time. Here is an example of a unit pro shops use. But the $300 price shouldn't deter you. There are cheaper versions of this type of vacuum bleeding system. But don't expect full reverse pressurization and all that other good stuff with the "at-home" versions like these

Hope this helps you some. Or try a search engine for brake bleeding tools and/ or proceedures.

Rear discs are so kick as$
 

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Hmm, I was able to bleed my brake without too much trouble when I replaced both of my rear wheel cylinders this past may. I did it by myself without any help either.

Of course I also used about two or three quarts of brake fluid, heh heh, but It worked.

Funny thing was I had this guy helping me, and I thought I was done, so I took the car for a drive around the block to test it for myself, and it was terrible. I spent another hour rebleeding the brakes by myself w/o any help and it came out perfect. *shrug*



You might have some obstruction in your brake lines... maybe that's part of the problem?
 

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Glad to see I'm not the only one having this problem. I was wondering if the problem had to do with the rear shoes not adjusting properly. They should self adjust, but if they don't you will always have a big gap that has to be covered by the shoes before you have a hard pedal.

I'm planning to bleed lines at the union box and the rears again. If that doesn't work, the rear drums may come back off and I'll try to "pre-adjust" the shoes. If that doesn't work, off to the brake shop for pressure bleeding.
 

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You also might need new rear drum adjusters (mazda calls them "operating levers"). They tend to rot out and sieze with old age. If they're rotted out you'll notice that the parking brake doesn't work very well.
 
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