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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well I tryed to do the breather mod that is on performanceprobe.com to my 1986 mazda 626. Well I only did it to the part that goes back in to the intake side, and not the one from the PCV valve. And now it stalls unless you have your foot in the gas. I read about that this mod effects you oil pressure, but then I read that some ppl have absolutely no bad effects from it. So should I get some hose and fix what I broke or do I need to do it to the PCV valve side to get it to run again?
good thing I wasnt planing on going anywhere

I read that some of you plug the part that comes off the intake pipeing, I just threw a filter on it:confused:


sorry for double posting but I havent goten a responce from the 626 section
 

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read that some of you plug the part that comes off the intake pipeing, I just threw a filter on it
plug this pipe piece on the manifold and put the filter on the pcv valve side.



at the end of the hose coming from the pcv valve is the filter.
 

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Here's the thing: If what ever port you're dealing with is doing the sucking (basically any part of the intake tract) it must be plugged or connected to something. If you don't, then it is seeing unmetered air and is acting as a huge vacuum leak.

Make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok thanxs for the help now I see what I did wrong, but what did you guys use to block the holes? I read someone used tape
 

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What, exactly, is the goal when installing these filters? I have the feeling that people are just sticking them on without any knowledge how the system works or its intended purpose.

I say forget about putting a filter on this system. You want the crankcase ventilation system to work as well as possible; any filter you put in the system is going to restrict the removal of blowby gas from the cylinder head. You want that blowby gas removed to avoid contaminating your oil. I don't see any advantage to filtering the PCV intake air or keeping the small amount of oil out of the dynamic chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
it is simple the "mod" helps keep everything cleaner by not leting oil vapers in to the intake system with will eventually mess with things, and since I am planing on a rebuild soon once I get everything clean and working good I dont want [email protected] going back inside:D
 
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I agree with Magik, however at one my point my six had horrible blow by, and after cleaning out my TB and intake piping I spliced a $2.99 fuel filter (That I could easily blow through, so it wasnt very restrictive) into the lines, I didn't remove or cap anything, so the air was still getting vented back.

The 'El cheapo Fuel filter caught the oil however, and kept my intake pipes clean and happy.

I did have to change it every month or so, because too much oil on it interrupted air flow.

I miss my '6.
 

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If oil is in the intercooler pipes and TB, that could also be a problem with the turbo. However, I suppose it is possible for blowby oil to get blown into the VAF boot if the blowby was that bad.
 

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FlySwat said:
I agree with Magik, however at one my point my six had horrible blow by, and after cleaning out my TB and intake piping I spliced a $2.99 fuel filter (That I could easily blow through, so it wasnt very restrictive) into the lines, I didn't remove or cap anything, so the air was still getting vented back.

The 'El cheapo Fuel filter caught the oil however, and kept my intake pipes clean and happy.

This mod works great and conpensates for extra boost pulling oil from your valve cover.
 

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magik8 said:
What, exactly, is the goal when installing these filters? I have the feeling that people are just sticking them on without any knowledge how the system works or its intended purpose
I agree this mod is not a wise thing to do.
First, the PCV works on suction. No suction = no air movement and valve will stay closed for the most part.
How many posts are there that state the problems with blowing the vavle cover gaskits after this mod is done?
Second, how much horsepower is lost by having a little blow by oil? Fix the problem causing the oil like leaky seals in the turbo. Also the design of the pcv system is such that it will not allow oil be sucked up in the flow. For those of you that do this mod, all of the contaminates remain in your engine instead of being burned off.
I am tired of typing. Read this info.

Crankcase Ventilation
The crankcase of an automobile is a collection point for a variety of materials or contaminants harmful to the motor oil and internal engine parts. Some materials found in the crankcase are abrasive solids such as dirt, sand, and metal particles. It is the responsibility of the oil filter to keep these abrasives from circulating to the friction surfaces and to keep the amount of wear to a minimum.
Other materials which collect in the crankcase, such as water, acids, and unburned fuel, may be in the form of either liquid or vapor. These materials are by-products of the combustion process. For example, when gasoline is burned in the presence of an adequate air supply, water is produced at a rate of about one gallon of water for each gallon of gasoline that is burned.

Most of the water and acids created as vapor in the combustion chamber are carried out of the engine through the exhaust. However, some of these vapors reach the crankcase as blow-by. This means that vapor is forced between the rings and the cylinder walls by combustion pressures which are as high as 700 lbs. per square inch. Blow-by occurs even with engines in good condition, but increases as engines become worn. Unburned fuel resulting from incomplete combustion may also enter the crankcase as blow-by vapor. Additionally, some unburned fuel may be forced into the crankcase on the compression stroke of the engine before the fuel/air mixture is ignited. Pressure in the combustion chamber during the compression stroke may be as high as 200 lbs./psi.

Water, acids, and unburned fuel may enter the crankcase in liquid form as well as vapor. These materials can condense on the cylinder walls and be washed into the crankcase with the motor oil. Even the materials which enter the crankcase as vapor do not remain in vapor form. As the engine cools, they condense on the internal engine parts in the motor oil. Certainly, water and other acids can severely damage internal parts by causing rust and corrosion. The motor oil additive must counteract the corrosives and keep the sludge-forming ingredients in suspension. Unburned fuel, when condensed, places an additional burden on the motor oil. Gasoline, in liquid form, affects motor oil additives and reduces the oil’s film strength. Dilution of motor oil with unburned fuels may also increase oil consumption.

Contaminants Cannot Be Prevented From Reaching The Crankcase
Therefore, the only way to combat the effect of these harmful materials is to vent them from the crankcase while they are in vapor form. In this regard, the temperature of the engine is a critical factor. As long as an engine is operating at normal temperatures, engine heat will prevent these contaminants from condensing. However, if these contaminants remain in the crankcase when the engine is stopped, they are condensed as the engine cools. The basic purpose of any crankcase ventilation system is simply to remove these harmful ingredients in vapor form at about the same rate in which they enter the crankcase.
The History Of Crankcase Ventilation
The problem of crankcase ventilation was recognized, and the first ventilation system installed, long before the current PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) systems were developed. In fact, the first crankcase ventilation system was installed in 1925. At that time it was referred to as a road draft tube system. The system used a vented oil filler cap and a tube which extended downward from the crankcase area to a point below the engine block. The lower end of the tube was open and exposed to the air flow when the vehicle was moving. At speeds above 20 MPH, the air passing over the open end of the tube created a low pressure area, or partial vacuum. This, in turn, caused a draft, or air flow, through the crankcase. Fresh air entered the crankcase through the vented oil filler cap, forcing vapor out through the road draft tube. The road draft tube system, although not effective at speeds below 20 MPH, provided adequate crankcase ventilation and remained in use until the modern PCV systems were developed.
Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) is a system that was developed to remove harmful vapor from the engine and to prevent vapor from reaching the atmosphere. The PCV system accomplishes this by using manifold vacuum to draw vapor from the crankcase into the intake manifold. Vapor is then carried with the fuel/air mixture into the combustion chambers where it is finally burned. Thus, PCV is effective as both a crankcase ventilation system and as a pollution control device.
Different PCV Systems
PCV systems have been standard equipment on all new cars since 1963. Prior to 1963 PCV was only sparsely used in California. There are a variety of PCV systems used on various makes and models of cars produced since 1963, but all function basically the same. Harmful vapor is drawn out of the crankcase to the intake manifold and fresh air is drawn into the crankcase. The flow or circulation within the system is controlled by the PCV Valve.
PCV systems can be described as either open or closed. The two systems are quite similar in their ability to provide good ventilation. However, the closed system in use since 1968 is more effective with regard to air pollution control. The systems differ in the manner in which fresh air enters the crankcase and excessive vapor is expelled.

OPEN PCV SYSTEMS
The open system draws fresh air through a vented oil filler cap. This presents no problem as long as the vapor volume is nominal. However, when the crankcase vapor becomes excessive it is forced back through the vented oil filler cap and into the open atmosphere. Therefore, the open PCV system though successful at removing contaminated vapors from the crankcase is not 100% effective as a pollution control device.


CLOSED PCV SYSTEMS
The closed PCV system draws fresh air from the air filter housing. The oil filler cap in this system is NOT vented. Consequently excess vapor will be carried back to the air filter housing where it enters the intake manifold through the carburetor. The closed system prevents vapor, whether normal or excessive, from reaching the open atmosphere. The closed system is very effective as an air pollution control device.

THE PCV VALVE
The most critical instrument in the PCV system is the flow control valve, commonly and heretofore referred to as the PCV Valve. The purpose of the valve is to meter the flow of the vapor from the crankcase to the intake manifold. This is necessary in order to provide proper ventilation for the crankcase, while not upsetting the fuel/air mixture for combustion.

Blow-by gases and vapor should be removed at about the same rate they enter the crankcase. Since blow-by is nominal at idle and increases during high-speed operation the PCV valve must control the flow of vapor accordingly. The PCV valve is designed to compensate for the ventilation needs at varying engine speeds. It is operated by manifold vacuum, which increases or decreases as engine speeds change.

For example, at low or idle engine speeds manifold vacuum is high.
This pulls the plunger to the extreme forward position, or manifold end of the valve. Due to the shape of the plunger vapor flow is reduced to a minimum. The low rate of the flow is adequate for ventilation purposes and will not upset the fuel/air mixture ratio.

At high speeds manifold vacuum is decreased. The plunger is only drawn to a point about midway in the housing. This allows a maximum flow of vapor., Since the engine is using more fuel/air mixture at high speeds, the introduction of more vapor does not affect performance. In the event of a backfire, pressure from the intake manifold forces the plunger to the closed or engine-off position. (see fig.5) This prevents the backfire flame from reaching the crankcase and exploding the combustible vapor.

Here is the link to the rest of the info http://www.magnumproducts.com/faq.htm
 

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yeah I don't agree with its benefit either, its like giving oxygen to two cancer infested lungs, you're helping it, but by how much?

That car is MORE than 10 years old, adding a little breather filter to help blowby isnt helping jack:rolleyes:

do it if you really want, but it is in no way, shape or form any type of miracle cure all for un mantained regular maintenance
 

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Is that a single-core radiator in that pic up there?

This mod worked great for me. I did it after cleaning my intake from filter to manifold. I took it all apart again after 6,000 miles (three oil changes) and the intake was nice and clean.

Clean that is in comparison to the first time I cleaned my intake. After my second oil change that time, I checked the throttle body and it was all dirty again.

But I also agree with the others.... This will in no way help your blowby problems. Nor will that Restore crap either. That stuff just left me with a silvery residue in my oil and on everything my oil touched. And this was noticed during the rebuild.
 

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FlySwat said:
88-89's had single cores.
CRAP! damn 1g-a's. So the 1g-b's have a bigger rad? They have plasitc endtanks, too, though, right?
 

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I believe only the 88-89 lx/dx had single row radiators. I'm pretty sure that the 88-89 GT and all 90-92's should have the two row radiators. They all came with plastic endtanks from the factory, but that really doesn't matter much as the OEM radiators did last 10-15 years. Aftermarket radiators for these cars are usually always two row.

It's hard to tell if that radiator in the pic is one or two row. It's definitely not the stock radiator, though. And that pic is from sleeper's car, which is a 91.
 
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