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****PLEASE READ: MX6.COM OR I ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR INJURY OR DEATH IN THE MISFORTUNE OF AN ACCIDENT IF YOU USED THIS WRITEUP TO INSTALL YOUR SEATS. IF GOOD HARDWARE AND THICK ENOUGH ALUMINUM/SHEET METAL IS USED, THESE SEATS WILL BE JUST AS STURDY, IF NOT STURDIER THAN STOCK SEATS. THE USE OF POOR QUALITY HARDWARE CAN RESULT IN DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY. USE DISCRETION WHEN INSTALLING THESE SEATS. I, IN NO WAY MAKE A CLAIM THAT MY INSTALLATION IS 100% "SAFE"****

I know from searching to get ideas on how to install my seats, that there are a lot of MX6'ers that would appreciate a write up on an aftermarket seat install. Since there isnt one, and I was doing the install/fabrication anyway, I decided to do a write up on it. This writeup is just a guide. No 2 aftermarket sliders are the same, so my measurements will mean nothing to you. However, this is a good basis on how one would install aftermarket seats. I hope this helps out a lot of people, because this write-up, and the install in general took some time.

Well, lets get on with it.....

Here is a picture of the seats I will be installing during this How To.



They are Bride Brix II replicas, covered in either Suede or Alcantra, or some type of immitation Suede. Theyre very accurate, and say Bride on front and back, on the tag, and on the Bolster adjustments. The only noticeable difference, is that Bride doesnt make seats in Suede or Alcantra, and Bride uses Memory Foam. These are not made of Memory Foam. They cost $489.99 shipped, from www.pitstopmotorsport.com. I actually bought mine off of Ebay, but its the same company. Search for "Bride Seats" in ebay, and the sellers name is dirkslyder. They come in Blue, Black and Red, Black and Blue, Black and Grey, Grey, Black, and Red. When he runs out of a certain color, it takes him about 8 months to get more in, so if they dont have the color you want (should you decide to purchase a pair) then youre SOL.

On a side note before we get started, he also has more realistic/accurate Bride replicas, but theyre more expensive ($899.99 shipped) Said replicas are the same fabric as real Brides (or similar) and have the Bride embroidery as seen here

Real Bride Brix II's



He also has the same seats as mine in "blanks" or without any writing or stitching on them at all. These are even less than what I paid for mine, somewhere in the high $300s I think.

When I bought these seats, I had no idea how I was going to mount them in the car. I had some vague ideas, but as far as anything concrete, I decided to wait till I got the seats to fab something up. My basic idea all along, was to cut the stock "feet" off of the stock sliders, and mount them somehow to the aftermarket sliders, keeping the same distance between the stock mounting points (side to side, and back to front)

First things first, I mounted the sliders up to the seats. There were no instructions, so it took me a while to figure out how they go, but after a little while, I figured them out, and bolted them up. Here is a picture of the aftermarket sliders bolted up to the aftermarket seats



After the sliders were bolted up to the seats, I had to take some measurements. I measured the distance between the holes in the aftermarket sliders, front to back, and side to side, and the stock mounting points where the "feet" of the stock sliders bolt up to the floor, front and back, and side to side.



...and the same thing with the floor.

The stock mounting points are further apart (side to side) than the holes in the aftermarket sliders, so obviously you cant bolt the "feet" up to the sliders themselves, or the holes for the bolts to go into the floor wont line up. The holes for the "feet" to mount the stock seats to the floor are 17 1/4" apart from side to side, and 18 3/8" apart from back to front (not important right now) The holes in the aftermarket sliders are 15 7/8" apart from side to side and 11" apart from back to front (not important right now)

To compensate for the difference in width, I decided to take a couple pieces of fairly thick aluminum, approximately an inch and a half in width, and 18" long and drill holes in them 15 7/8" apart, and mount them to the front and back holes, going across from one aftermarket slider to the other. Like this:



Then, drill a couple holes in the aluminum, 17 1/4" apart, to mount the stock "feet" to. Since the bolts that hold the "feet" to the aluminum will still be under the aftermarket sliders, I had to put some washers between the aftermarket sliders and the aluminum, so that the bolts that hold the "feet" to the aluminum dont hit the sliders, and interfere with moving forward or back when theyre installed. Here is what I mean:



This idea will work with the back "feet" as well, however, you have to make sure that you mount the aluminum that holds the back "feet" to the aftermarket sliders a certain distance from the front "feet", or else the mounting points wont line up (from back to front)

Now that we have an idea of how we're going to mount the "feet" to the aftermarket sliders, and all our measurements are taken, all that is left is actually doing it.

Before discussing hardware needed, I'll go over the tools I used to do this install:
-Dremel
-Lots of cut off wheels
-Ratchet
-14MM socket
-1/2" socket (this will be different depending on the bolts you buy)
-1/2" wrench (this will be different depending on the bolts you buy)
-Drill
-3/8" drill bit (this will be different depending on the bolts you buy)
-Safety glasses (optional, but recommended)
-Hammer (used to get the "feet" off once the rivets were grinded down)
-Vise grips (made removal of the "feet" easier)
-Allen key (this will be different depending on the seats you buy)

I made a list of all the hardware I needed to complete the project, and went to the hardware store and went shopping. Here is the hardware I used:



-8 short bolts (these hold the "feet" to the sheet metal, 1 on each corner, 4 per seat)

-16 nuts (these were used for both the "feet" to sheet metal mounting holes and the bolts for the aftermarket sliders to sheet metal holes. 2 per corner, 8 per seat)

-32 washers (used to take care of the issue discussed a few paragraphs back. 4 per corner, 16 per seat)

*NOTE: REMEMBER THE DISCLAIMER AT THE TOP OF THIS WRITE-UP. IT'S RECOMMENDED THAT YOU USE GRADE 8 HARDWARE. I WILL PROBABLY UPGRADE THE ALUMINUM TO "FEET" BOLTS IN THE FUTURE, BUT THEYRE FINE FOR NOW*

I already had the bolts to make the aftermarket slider to aluminum connections. They came with the seats, I just needed nuts for them, which is what the extra 8 nuts are for

Total cost in Hardware=$15.00

Once all the hardware needed is collected, its time to cut the "feet" off of the stock sliders. These were a bitch to get off, so good luck. I used a dremel for this, but you can use your prefered method. A dremel would be easiest, and to be honest, I cant think of any other way to do it. I basically had to grind/cut the bottom of the rivets down until they were flush, and then bang the [shizzle] out of the "feet" with a hammer until they came off. One of the "feet" in the back have a couple welds that hold it on as well, so this one will be a little more difficult to get off.

If you dont want to ruin the stock sliders, then I suggested talking to Mike Hughes (Hughes46) about some sliders that you can cut the feet off of. Its always good to have a set of spare seats that you can bolt in, but my stock seats are garbage anyway, so I dont really care :shrug:

Stock front "feet" after removal:



Instead of mounting the aluminum to the aftermarket sliders, and then playing guessing games on how the "feet" should be mounted, I decided to do the opposite. I bolted the "feet" in the car how they would go if they had seats attached to them, and then mounted the sheet metal across the fronts, and across the backs as well. It was necessary to drill a bigger hole in the "feet" to fit the bolts through. Here is what I mean:



Then, drill holes in the aluminum, and mount it to the "feet", like so:



The backs will look like this once you do the same thing to them that you did to the fronts:



*NOTE: THE PICTURE ABOVE IS NOT HOW I MOUNTED THE REAR "FEET" TO THE ALUMINUM. I HAD TO MOVE THE BOLT TO THE FRONT HOLES, AS THE HOLES IN THE SLIDERS DID NOT LINE UP WITH THE ALUMINUM, AND I DID NOT REALIZE THIS UNTIL AFTER I TOOK THIS PICTURE*
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Seeing as I work 7 days a week lately, and I use my car everyday, I decided to make things easier on myself. I couldnt go a day or two without a driver seat, so I took the passenger seat out first, and used the "feet" on it for the driver side. I had to switch the back "feet" around, because the outside has a bolt that screws into the floor like the fronts, and the inside has a stud coming out of the floor, which goes through the hole, and then has a nut that screws on top of it. This way I could get the driver seat bolted down in one day, and then take my time working on the passenger side, while still having a car to drive.

Moving on.....

Once the "feet" are mounted together by the sheet metal (2 fronts together, and 2 backs together) go ahead and take them out of the car.



Now I had to drill holes in the aluminum next to the "feet" to mount the aluminum to the sliders. Here is what I mean:



This is where the washers will come into play. Since the "feet" will still be over the sliders partially, I had to put some washers between the aluminum and the sliders to act as a spacer, so the head of the bolt that holds the "feet" to the aluminum doesnt hit the sliders and interfere with the movement of the seat once it is installed.

Almost done (with one seat anyway)

This next part was a little tricky. It was hard trying to be exact with your mounting of the rear "feet". If you dont mount them right, the front and back holes wont line up. I bolted the rear "feet" down to the floor, and then put the seat in over them, and bolted the front "feet" down (while attached to the seat)

Then, I moved the seat all the way forward, and made marks in the aluminum through the holes in the sliders, where the holes needed to be drilled. This is what I meant earlier when I said I had to move the bolts that connected the "feet" to the aluminum forward. The holes in the sliders werent over the aluminum completely, so I had to move the aluminum forward.



Once the marks were made, I took the seat out again, and drilled the holes, and then took the rear "feet" out.

Now all that is left is to bolt the rear "feet" up to the sliders the same way you did the front ones.



Now lets just hope they fit :tup: After a quick vacuum to get rid of all the metal shavings, I put the seat in. I had to mess around with them and take the seat out a few times to get all 4 holes to line up, but after a while, and making a couple adjustments, it finally bolted down.



And thats it. 1 down, 1 to go. Make sure all the bolts are tight, and have a seat.

After the first seat is in, do the exact same thing to the other one. I will be installing mine probably sometime this week maybe. Atleast now I can take my time on it.

I know some of you are probably saying "What about a seatbelt?!?!?" :confused: I will also be doing a small writeup on a 3 point harness install sometime this week. I have some Sparco 3 point harnesses coming Monday, so be on the lookout for that as well. It wont be as complex, but I think it still deserves a small writeup. If you dont want to go that route, and want stock seatbelts still, I dont know what to tell you. It can be done, but it probably involves welding, and I decided not to stay with the stock seat belts.

This total install took probably 5 or 6 hours, per seat. A lot of measuring, a lot of cutting, a lot of drilling, a lot of thinking, a lot of stress, and of course, a lot of aggravation. On a scale of 1 to 10, 1 being you can install it yourself in under 20 minutes, 5 being professional installation recommended, and 10 being professional installation highly important, I give it a 6. Not completely impossible, but if you dont have any experience with anything like this, I dont recommend it. I have no experience with any kind of fabrication really, but I guess I just lucked out :shrug:

If anyone questions whether or not this is actually safe, I honestly couldnt answer that question. The aluminum I used is from Timco Aviation Services where I work. They use it on passenger jetliners, and the 2 bolts in each corner ("feet" to aluminum connection and aluminum to sliders connection) are so close together, that any flexing of the aluminum is non-existent. I would however feel a lot more comfortable upgrading the bolts that I bought (not the ones that came with the seats) to some Grade 8 hardware. I think this will be fine for now though. The seat is very sturdy, and doesnt want to move. This doesnt mean it wont launch me through the windshield if I ever get into an accident, but hopefully that never happens.

Comments, suggestions, questions, send me a PM, and I hope this writeup has helped someone. I know theres a lot of people who will appreciate it.
 

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oh no good write up yes.
But heres some major suggestions that you SHOULD fix if you do this. Im not flaming you. But You shouldnt use aluminum unless its atleast 1/4 to 3/8 thick, You should also use Grade 5 or higher hardware,Standard hardware can strip/and break with 2 hand wrench's i wouldnt trust them holding my seat in exspecially if your using a harness..

I used heat strengthened steel and grade 8 hardware..

Edit:/ i realise you said its sheet metal, but it really looks like aluminum. If it is, its to thin it looks less then 3/16..
Get flat stock steel instead.. no sheet metal.
Your seat holds alot of weight (you) 100-200lb average and with you in it strapped in to your harness.. if you were to get in an accident.. who knows what would happen if the seat broke loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was actually wondering how my fabrication (contraption) would hold up if I got into an accident. I gotta say, it seems pretty solid. The bolts in each corner (ie, the bolts that hold the feet to the sheet metal, and the sheet metal to the sliders) are so close together (about half an inch apart) that any flexing of the aluminum is nonexistent. I know this doesnt mean that it wont break when/if I get into an accident, but we'll see I guess. I will probably upgrade to some better hardware on the feet to sheet metal connections. The sheet metal to sliders bolts were actually bolts that came with the seats, and they seem to be really good hardware. Also, I think the aluminum I used is fine. I could probably double it up to be safe, but I got it from Timco Aviation Services where I work. They use it on passenger jets :shrug: But thanks for bringing that up. Ill probably use some better bolts in the future, but for now, theyre not going anywhere, and that gave me the idea of putting a disclaimer on the write-up, so I wont be held liable of some idiot decides to use this as a basis to put in his seats and uses aluminum foil and erector set bolts :lol:
 

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Also, I gotta go through this writeup and resize a few pics (like the ones that have writing on them so you can read it) and see if theres anything I need to add. I didnt even proofread it, and kinda rushed through the second half of it. Ill probably do that tomorrow night, so it should be ready to be copied to the projects section by then. Anymore suggestions comments or questions let me know. Im surprised this thread hasnt gotten more replies yet
 

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Thanks for the karma and comments guys. I just took about an hour going through it and adding some more information, and finalizing it, so if a mod sees this, its safe to move it to the projects section now. If anyone has any questions or comments, PM me
 
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