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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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I believe an intercooler sprayers put out a lot more Nitrous than a typical 50 shot or even 100 shot. So a 9oz bottle (what's included in the auction) would not last long at all.

Side note, the spelling isn't your fault. It's a 'practical joke' or something to help make things more difficult to read.
 

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dont buy that garbage on ebay... its a 9oz co2 bottle that i used to use for paintball hahahah so u cant use it... its a scam and get a real nitrous kit if your thinkin of doing it..... sometimes ppl sell thier WHOLE kits used for 200 bucks... just look around on here and probetalk.com performanceprobe.com... etc.
 

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Not worth the effort to log in to eBay. You can fabricate your own intercooler spray kit for less than $100 and the most expensive part will be the pressure switch/solenoid. If you're really adventageous you could buy copper tubing from Home Depot along with a tube bender and make it any size you want. A bottle will cost you a couple bucks and filling it with CO2 is as simple as going to your local soft drink bottler.

So long as you have someone to weld or access to a welder, you can make a couple intercooler fittings and slide a tube through the middle. You'd use a similar diameter to your intercooler piping, cut two holes in the upper and lower diamater and slip a section of pipe through the hole, 1/8" or1/4" will work fine. When the pipe is in the hole, you weld the outside shut leaving a 1/4-1/2" sticking out from the bottom and top for hoses to attach to.

Depending on how much effort you want to do, you can make a couple fittings. One for the intercooler pipe leaving the turbos discharge nozzle, and one after the intercooler en route to the throttle body.

As far as attaching them (2) you'd route your tubing from the CO2 bottle to the solenoid (discharge) into the 1st tube THROUGH the intercooler pipe, out of the bottom, onto the next which would be AFTER the intercooler, leaving the intercooler it would attach to the spray bar which is fixed to your intercooler, and exit to the atmosphere.

None of the CO2 enters INTO the piping whatsoever, nor INTO your engine. The pipes that you make merely pass THROUGH the intercooler fittings, through the hose, onto the next fitting, leading to your spray bar, and out into the atmosphere. A Dremel works nice to drill small holes in the spray bar assuring that it will exit.

The attempt is to lower the temp of the boost pressure when it leaves the turbos nozzle before it hits the intercooler, chill the intercooler, and the extra fitting is there for reassurance after the intercooler. Although in actuality, it would leave the tank and hit both fittings before the intercooler. The intercooler is just the discharge point.

I ran this same setup years ago and found temperature drop of 20-30 degrees.
 

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Why havent you run it again with the new rebuild??...It be nice to see what kind of numbers it can produce..
 

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I don't care enough to bother with it. It's nice on a dyno though because your intercooler is hardly getting what the conditions on the road would give you. Most dyno shops don't own a fan adequate enough to reproduce the conditions that you'd see at say 90-100 mph, which you see on the dyno. The problem is that CO2 displaces oxygen and even a small amount (residual from your spray bar) is enough to lower performance should it get into your intake tract via the filter which is right above the intercooler. Think of a CO2 fire extinguisher, it works the same way by stealing the oxygen that the fire needs to breathe. My old system had the intercooler and air filter on opposite sides of the engine so I wasn't worried too much, but there were a few times that I dynoed lowered with the same boost levels. If I had it to do over again I wouldn't even use a spray bar period.

I might do it again, but I also might buy another car, I also might do alot of things. I'll draw a picture so you can see what I mean:

 

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maybe its because its too early or maybe because im special but that picture looks like a turbo with abunch of scribble lines...does the cooler run through the system twice? then it looks like it gets sprayed on the ic? hmm damn pretty clever idea lmao i just figured it out by typing it down haha

i guess if you had the heatshield blocking any engine bay air or was still using a stock air box with a dropin there might not be too much problem eh?


EDIT: i guess if you really wanted to you could custom fab an endtank/core section having the core in the pipe and having endtanks to shoot the co2 or nitrous or whatever your gonna use through the core so then thered be alot more surface area to be chilled and to convert air temps...but hell knows how efficent that would be
 

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you just have to make sure your intake filter is not in the engine bay with the CO2 sprayer. you wanna pipe it out of the flow of the CO2. the turbo mustang guys have already been dealing with this. you don't want your engine taking a deep breath of CO2 when running hard.
 

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mazda_6t9 said:
you just have to make sure your intake filter is not in the engine bay with the CO2 sprayer. you wanna pipe it out of the flow of the CO2. the turbo mustang guys have already been dealing with this. you don't want your engine taking a deep breath of CO2 when running hard.
Doesn't matter where your bar is in relation to your filter. If you're in the same room and a CO2 tank is opened, it is enough to effect your performance negatively. So long as you're running a spray bar with CO2 at a track or on the open road, this doesn't matter as much as you're moving forward and any residual is dissipated 1) by the amount of the atmospehere 2) by the fact that you're no longer where you were when you sprayed it. For dyno's, spraying CO2 is a no no as your car is stationary except for the fans that dyno shops usually/hopefully use. If you were to use a spray bar on a dyno, you'd want nitrous in the tank rather than CO2, but if you were really serious you'd have nitrous setup for the engine to begin with.
 
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