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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've got a good size detached garage (24x30). Last winter, I heated it for an entire motor swap in January using a 15,000 BTU propane infrared heater. That didn't bring up the temperature much, but after long enough, I couldn't see my breath anymore which was a bonus. I did have a CO detector plugged in at a very low outlet for safety, plus the device has a low oxygen cutoff switch.

Anyway, I've been considering upgrading this year to something more as even that heater probably was not legal due to potentially flammable fumes which could be in the garage due to gas cans, vehicles, lawn mower, etc.

The garage is insulated and finished on the interior as well as has an insulated ceiling before the attic space. There is already 220 60 Amp electrical service installed. There is no natural gas in the area and all of my utilities are electric so I have no LP tank or oil tank available. But I do plan on installing an LP tank so I can have a gas stove probably next year sometime, could be made sooner if it was for this effort.

My goal is to get about 50 degrees for a temperature when it is lets say 20 degrees outside. For legality, I would think any form of open flame which is fed from air inside the garage is no good.

For costs, I would like a low initial investment as well as low maintenance costs. Don't forget low fuel costs. All these need to be taken into account and I know that, at best, I'll get 2 of the 3.
 

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You're lucky my dad built his garage and had 220V installed and we use this type of heating fan.

We have 2, 1 in each corner in the end of the garage about 30x20 or so double door garage with an attic.

BRH402 Heavy-Duty Electric Garage Heater 13,650 BTU

They are thermostat controlled so you can set them up just hot enough to remove the humidity or keep on to heat the garage.

By the way we work often during winter in the garage with -30*C and they make a major diff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Blade for your suggestion. The propane heater I used was 15,000 BTU and I think I really need to step it up from there this year.
 

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burn wood in a metal trashcan.

hobos know whats going on.




but really, my friend had a toaster like heater for his detatched garage and it worked pretty good when you were close to it... and it was pretty darn small too. if you could find a full size one that would work.
 

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Cheapest and most effective way (IMO)?:


Old fashioned cast-iron wood stove. It heats our cabin, which is bigger than that garage, pretty well.

only problem is you would need a supply of wood.:shrug:

For costs, I would like a low initial investment as well as low maintenance costs. Don't forget low fuel costs. All these need to be taken into account and I know that, at best, I'll get 2 of the 3.
No maintenance, low initial investment, low install cost (just the vent going outside the garage), and low fuel cost. How about all 4? Yes plz:p:lol:



If you did natural gas, that would open your choices up to an almost infinite number of choices. A freind has a gas heater in his garage (about the same size as yours) that heats it up to 70degrees in about 15minutes. What a strange coincidence that we always do car work at his garage in the winter:lol:





Those little propane heaters work for small areas, but everytime we try and use one for a garage it walways ends up making it so we're standing 10ft from the heater at all times, and never gets the garage itself warm:shrug: :(

You could try a larger propane sunflower heater. those might work a little better.
 

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Got a couple of these at work and they are handy as hell when its freezing out.. warm up the place in minutes..
Reddy Heater Kerosene Forced Air Heater — 40,000 BTU, Model# RC40 | Kerosene | Northern Tool + Equipment

If your garage is pretty packed and small, probaly not a good idea though, they get very hot fast and need to be aimed into a open area. Also Kerosene gets expensive. We usually burn offroad deisel because you can buy it right at the gas station.


Ive been lookin at electrics,waiting till cold hits..they will have deals..also still need to insulate my garage.. Ouellet 10,000 Watt Commercial Fan-Forced Heater, Model# OASU10000T | Heaters | Northern Tool + Equipment
 

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we have a woodstove in our 30x40 non insulated and it still works pretty good. with it insulated a woodstove would have you cooking in there, not that thats a bad thing when your working on a car in subfreezing temps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cheapest and most effective way (IMO)?:


Old fashioned cast-iron wood stove. It heats our cabin, which is bigger than that garage, pretty well.
How about this, I have access to a good sized cast iron wood stove and have already investigated this route. Unfortunately, the building inspector said that it does not meet the MA safety guides and quoted the part about burning "solid fuels" in an area with "flammable fumes". I personally know a building commissioner (higher than building inspector, but from a different town) and he said a wood stove is perfectly acceptable. But if I push the inspector, whenever I need something inspected, he could make my life quite difficult, so I'm avoiding this route for now.
If you did natural gas, that would open your choices up to an almost infinite number of choices. A freind has a gas heater in his garage (about the same size as yours) that heats it up to 70degrees in about 15minutes. What a strange coincidence that we always do car work at his garage in the winter:lol:
But what about expense of initial equipment plus installation.
Ive been lookin at electrics,waiting till cold hits..they will have deals..also still need to insulate my garage.. Ouellet 10,000 Watt Commercial Fan-Forced Heater, Model# OASU10000T | Heaters | Northern Tool + Equipment
Even though you're looking at these, do you have any experience with them? I hate the idea of more electric running, but with the cost of gas/fuel, it's not that much worse if any at this point.
19000 BTU and just buy 2 of these and you'll be a roasted marshmellow

BRH562 Heavy-Duty Portable Electric Shop Heater - 19000 BTU
2 of these would be nice indeed.
 

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But what about expense of initial equipment plus installation.
Initial equipment isnt too bad if you buy used, but the initial installation cost will be high (Unles you know someone who does it for a living)


How about this, I have access to a good sized cast iron wood stove and have already investigated this route. Unfortunately, the building inspector said that it does not meet the MA safety guides and quoted the part about burning "solid fuels" in an area with "flammable fumes".
What flammable fumes is he talking about?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What flammable fumes is he talking about?
He interpreted it as having any vehicle, gas powered lawn equipment, or gas can in the area. He even said just a simple table saw can cause flammable fumes (which is actually true if not properly directed).

Again, my arguing will not be good in the future. He did offer to entertain any contradicting rules if I could find any.
 

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Under his interpretation, a wood stove would not be legal anywhere, anytime.:rolleyes:



Sompe people are wrong. its a shame that a lot of times it's people in authority positions, and htose people will never admit they are wrong:shrug:




But if you have other alternatives, I guess its not a good idea to argue with him (Though I would:lol:). What are the costs of actually having natural gas run in to you?
 

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technically he is right though. especially gas cans... the fumes are very flammable - more so than your average under-counter assortment of aerosol cans. I'm betting he wasn't trying to say all garages, all the time, are a non-choice for pot belly stoves... just that your garage, with its current contents is.

the easy fix? since its a detached garage - get an outdoor rubbermaid shed and store the gas and other fumables in there, but still within easy access.

or cut a vent, grate, and use a vented storage solution inside the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
technically he is right though. especially gas cans... the fumes are very flammable - more so than your average under-counter assortment of aerosol cans.

the easy fix? since its a detached garage - get an outdoor rubbermaid shed and store the gas and other fumables in there, but still within easy access.
The building inspector here interprets the law to include even just vehicles which should not be exposing any gas to the air.

He did admit that if I stored nothing with gasoline in the garage, I was more than welcome to have a wood stove in it.
 

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that inspector is plain wrong then... attached garages with egresses from the house face far stricter codes, and you can *still* put your car in... lol.
 

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Can you get another inspector? I also agree on getting a tin can shed to hold all of your gas/generator/whatever's flammable
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You are all just confirming exactly what I've been told by a Building Commissioner (higher than Building Inspector, but from a different town) has told me.

Unfortunately, if I push the issue, this guy could be in office forever and when I need a permit to do something different, he could come down very hard on me to meet every letter of the law.
 

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You are all just confirming exactly what I've been told by a Building Commissioner (higher than Building Inspector, but from a different town) has told me.

Unfortunately, if I push the issue, this guy could be in office forever and when I need a permit to do something different, he could come down very hard on me to meet every letter of the law.
A pain in the ass yes, BUT, if you ever decide to sell (if you own), your inspection will be flawless :tup: Of course, that's the only upside I see to that point.
 
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