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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

It's my 6s' turn to be squeaky today :D Well she has been the past few days really so I'm guessing it's time to change the front brake pads after reading through old posts. Now my dilemma is, buy some good pads and fit them myself, OR buy std pads and get someone to fit them. So, I read about removing the bottom bolt and stuff from the caliper and lifting it up etc but does anyone know of a guide to do this or can give me a quick run down of what to do? It sounds easy from what I've read. But I want to make sure all the blanks are filled so I don't come up against anything I think is tricky which most likely will be simple. I shall do this the weekend you see if I get pads in time and I can take pics! Thus creating another guide for mx6db. Also gives me a chance to clean up my calipers again :D They are black at the moment, but should be yellow hehe :muhaha:

Any help whatsoever greatly appreciated
Jase :)
 

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brakes

Hello Jason,

The Haynes book is probably your best guide.

Your main job will be to get all the tools required. If you buy a toolkit from (say) Halfords you will need a breaker bar to go with it as the bolts which hold the caliper to the hub carrier will be difficult to undo. A cheapo 3/8" ratchet won't give you enough torque.

Although you could do this job off a jack it is good practise to put the front of the car on axle stands - just in case.

If you are going to paint the calipers you may need to take them off the car, which will involve removing the brake line (the hydraulic line that goes back to the brake booster / servo). If you do this you will need to bleed the brakes as air will be present in the system.

You may find the pads are okay but the parts that rub on the carrier may need lubricating with copper grease. This is a common cause of brake squeal. Worn pads aren't. Worn pads make a horrible grinding noise when applied and may also shudder and vibrate. They will also start to damage the brake disc.

Ian
 

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If you are replacing pads, check the fitting instructions that come with them carefully. Some pads specifically say NOT to use copper grease. My EBC front pads said not to use any at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Calipers are already painted so they're just covered in brake dust :D I get varying sounds really. There's a quietish squeal which gets worse up to a certain point of braking and then it goes quiet and then if I brake harsher it sounds a bit like a train stopping but not as loud :jump: If I then say turn onto a side road, depending on how much I used the brake, there's a slight constant squeak until I just lightly touch the brake pedal for a second. Also, I was braking hard down a slight hill the other day and it did grind a little and sometimes feels like the feeling when you get brake fade. I've looked at where the pads are on the front driver side and I can see a thin peice of metal which would touch the disk when braking.

I also read about not applying copper grease to some pads and some not having the squeak stopper things or something. I guess I'll just have to see what I get.

Jase
 

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Buy mintex pads, and fit them yourself.... if you can't fit front pads, you shouldn't be walking the streets.. })

It is just a case of removing one bolt, and rotating the caliper upwards..
then clean things up, and change the pads... refit the caliper..

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Einstein said:
Buy mintex pads, and fit them yourself.... if you can't fit front pads, you shouldn't be walking the streets.. })


It is just a case of removing one bolt, and rotating the caliper upwards..
then clean things up, and change the pads... refit the caliper..

John
OMG does that mean I can't leave work tonight haha :ewink:

I've got ratchet with all the attachments, so it won't work then? :sigh: I did actually buy a toolkit from halfords. Hmm I'll have to check out breaker bars. So, take out bolt, lift up caliper, remove old pad, remove old brake dust, fit new pad, return caliper to original place, stick bolt back in and tighten?? Sounds easy enough. I don't need to bleed brakes or anything do I as I am changing pads?

Jase
 

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breaker bars

You can get 3/8" and 1/2" breaker bars.

If your toolkit is 3/8" you might get away with the smaller breaker.

I don't think a 3/8" ratchet would be enough if the bolts decide to be really awkward.

Just something else I thought of - if the discs are getting worn then there will be a lip around the edge which means you have to push the piston in further to pull the pads off over it. Alternatively you could grind the lip off.

ifc
 

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jasonuk26 said:
If I then say turn onto a side road, depending on how much I used the brake, there's a slight constant squeak until I just lightly touch the brake pedal for a second.

That's a classic sign of a sticky caliper.
 

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A half inch ratchet will be sufficent for the calliper bolt. Jack it up and take the wheel off. Now crack open the bleed nipple half a turn then using a screwdriver or some other lever force the inner piston back into the calliper as far as it will go. the brake fluid dispersed by doing this will ejaculate from the open bleed nipple. Close the nipple then undo the top bolt on the calliper. You'll need to pull off the plastic cover on the bolt and it is a 10mm socket to fit it. Swing the calliper down and slide it off it's lower pin. Remove the pads and then clean everything thoroughly. Assemby is a reversal of the removal procedure. Don't forget to pump the brakes before use to adjust them and top up the brake fluid if necessary.

Gerry
 

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Why is Gerry doing upside down to the rest of us, you're not in OZ are you Gerry :D

Biggest problem Jase is pushing the piston back in so you can get the new pads in. I bough a G clamp rather than use a pry bar.
The caliper bolts should not be a problem as they are only torqued to 33 36ft/lbs.

Axel stands or a solid trolley jack are a must, we don't want another Kyle do we })
I would buy some copper slip to lube the bolts where the caliper slides and also a thin smear on the retaining clips where the caliper also slides.

Jack up near the wheel, wheel off and put under car so if anything does happen at least the car falls on the wheel and not the ground.

Put the g-clamp fixed bit on the back of the caliper and the screw on the outer brake pad and screw (if you'll pardon the expresion). I see no need to release the bleed nipple, the clamp should force the fluid back into the main reservoir.

Undo the lower caliper bolt and carefully swing the caliper up and secure it up with a bit of string or wire.

Note the various retaining clips and shims so you can put them back correctly and remove the outer brake pad first, then the inner pad.

You should be able to see where the caliper and its bits (clips & shims) move, clean these surfaces and a add a thin smear of copper slip.

Fit the new pads and then refit the retaining clips and shims.

While the caliper is raised up you can apply copper slip to the upper bolt where the caliper slides.

When the new pads and shims/clips are in place lower the caliper down. If the caliper won't go past the inner pad use the g-clamp to push the piston back in, use a piece of wood between the g-clamp and the piston.

Once the caliper is back in place clean the bottom bolt, a coat of copper slip and fasten up -job done.
 

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I've been putting new pads and caliper on the rear of mine, that's where I got the up/down thing mixed up.
I would still loosen the nipple! yes the fluid will get forced back into the master cylinder resorvoir if you don't but it could overflow pouring fluid all over your bodywork.
It's best to keep the slides clean and dry as adding grease only makes the brake dust stick to it seizing it up. These are chromed if you look (or stainless) so don't need lubing. Grease the pins the caliper slides on though but clean them of old grease first by spraying with WD which will disolve it.

Gerry
 

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If you open the nipple, there is a chance air could be sucked back in...

Leave it alone... just open the bonnet, and keep an eye on the fluid level... its easy to suck a bit out with a pipe.. should the need arise..

I hope you document this for the DB Jase..

John
 

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when i do mine i take the time to give the whole brake area a good clean witha spray of brake and clutch cleaner, then a wash off with a fairly stiff brush. Allow to dry....
When i have the caliper off i try to remove any old grease ( especially around the slide pins - iff applicable( see other posts!)) After this i grease the glide pins alittle and i mean alittle! check the rubber bellows are all ok and clean around the sealing edges. then add alittle, and again i cant stress that too much, grease to the area on the caliper that the pad retainer clips sit on. finally just add a smear of grease to the edges of the pad that come into contact with the caliper and refit.
set everything up, spray the disk with cleaner again and rotate to check no grease on disk..... and its done.
NOTE! Never add more that a smear of grease so that its just almost invisable coat, if you can see thick smears or blobs then its way too much, dont want any coming off and on to the disk do you?!
So thats the way i was shown by a guy that used to race 500bhp cosworths! But like someone said always check the instruction with the pads you have purchased!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I'm scared now! :cry: hehe All this talk of nipples and g clamps and grease and pistons and what not. I guess I just need to watch someone do it and then I can do it myself. I'm getting them fitted locally after all :sigh:, however I will write this up as a guide with no photos for now as I think we have quite a lot of good info here that I don't want to go to waste. If anyone has any pics at some point then please let me know. I would take pics tomorrow while they're doing it, but it sounds like they're not sure at what point in the day it'll be looked at. But thanks all for the pointers anyway. The thing that worries me the most is where to put the grease and where not to put grease and the piston and such and a few more bits. It'll be freezing cold anyway tomorrow :shrug: I'll definately make more of an effort next time tho when it's warm again. I'm a coward I know oh dear :flamer: :jump: hehe })

Jase
 

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Jase... not sure if you saw it. But the symptons you describe are also classic signs of a sticky caliper. I've had a lot of experience with sticky calipers, due to all the roundabouts in MK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Heckler said:
Jase... not sure if you saw it. But the symptons you describe are also classic signs of a sticky caliper. I've had a lot of experience with sticky calipers, due to all the roundabouts in MK.
Oh yeah just saw that, it probably needs re-greasing which they should do tomorrow. Prob full of gunk. The squeak is definate pads tho. I can't see much of the pads left and to be fair it has been well over a year since the last set :D They were EBC Greens so quite pleased with them! I couldn't get Mintex ones quickly so had to get EBC again but not green this time:

http://www.ebcbrakes.com/featuresandbenefits.html

Jase
 
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