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whenever i shift my rmps dont go down until like 5 seconds after i push the clutch in...does that mean my clutch is going or what?
 

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Forgive me if I'm wrong here, but what would a slipping clutch disc have to do with this problem? mx6racingrl is saying that when she pushes the clutch pedal to the floor, the rpms don't fall right away. Sounds like a problem with the clutch release (slave) cylinder to me. Perhaps there is air in the system or the release cylinder is bad. (This seems to be a common theme around here.....)
 

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Well it's certainly not going to get any better. Eventually, you might get stuck in gear due to the release cylinder not releasing. That would definitely suck.

This is a relatively simple repair. Take it to a mechanic ASAP if you're not familiar with the clutch hydraulic system. Tell them the clutch hydraulic system has air in it and the release cylinder probably needs replacing. You likely have a large amount of air in the system already so you will need a power bleeder to get the air out.
 

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Don't bring it to a mechanic unless he charges $50 or less. You can do this yourself, and buy the tools for under $20. What you will need:

Self bleeder kit for breaks/clutch (~$5 @ Autozone)
DOT 4 Fluid (~$3 @ Autozone)
8mm Wrench (~$10 @ Sears, Autozone may not have it)

If you look underneath the front of your car, towards the drivers side you will find the slave cylinder. It it bolted on the out side of the transmission. It has 2 parts, the first has a metal tube going into the metal block and there is a brass nipple comming out of the block @ 45°. The other part is a piston that has a rubber boot over it. It is this piston that separats the clutch and pressure plate to disconnect the engine from the tranny. All you need to do is fill the the container of the self bleeder half way, connect the tube to the brass nipple on the slave cylinder and attach the container via the magnet (or duct tape if it doesn't stay) to some where above the slave cylinder. The self bleeder has to be above the slave cylinder for the air to rise out of the system. Now, take the 8mm wrench and loosen up the nipple untill a little bit of fluid comes out. Now open your hood if you haven't already and find the clutch resivoir. Goto your left fender (sit in the car, point to the left. That side) and find the brake resivoir. It will be a big round container with a black cap. Yes, it's the one right in front of you. Now look down below between the brake resivoir and the fender. The clutch resivoir is rectangle with a round cap. Screw the cap off and fill the resivoir with the DOT 4 fluid.
Go pump the clutch 8 times. Is resivoir now only half full? If not go pump the clutch another 8 times and cheack again. Repeat 10 times if nescisary. If it's still not half empty or more, something is wrong, like you didn't loosen the nipple enough, or some part of your car is damaged or broken. Once you get it to half full, fill up the resivoir and close it, tighten up the nipple, take off the self bleeder and you should be all set!

Timeframe: 10-30 min
 

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While I agree that replacing the slave cylinder is an easy do-it-yourself job, the problem is that she probably has a lot of air in the clutch line, and it may not all come out using the manual bleed method. It seems that several people on this site have mentioned that they could not get all of the air out of their clutch system by bleeding it manually. It will likely need a power bleeder of some sort to effectively purge the system of air. That is the reason I suggested having a mechanic do it.

If you have a mechanic do it, it will probably be about $50-100 due to the labor charge. If you do it yourself, it will cost about $30-40, but that's assuming you can get all of the air out of the system manually.
 

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magik8 said:
]it may not all come out using the manual bleed method. It seems that several people on this site have mentioned that they could not get all of the air out of their clutch system by bleeding it manually.
This is true, even I have some air in my clutch. However I just have to press it down a little farther. It is not nearly as bad as she mentioned on her car.
 

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Panther37 said:
This is true, even I have some air in my clutch. However I just have to press it down a little farther. It is not nearly as bad as she mentioned on her car.
I also had this issue. I bled the system using a vacume pump bleeder. Works great.

~Chris
 

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magik8 said:
Well it's certainly not going to get any better. Eventually, you might get stuck in gear due to the release cylinder not releasing. That would definitely suck.
Not to mention the beating her synchros are taking when she's changing gears with clutch incompletely disengaged.

Broken transaxle would also "definately suck".
 
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To put it in laymans terms:

Synchros are brass rings that allow you to shift gears without having them grind into each other (You know the sound). By running without clutch fully disengaged things in your transmission are still going to be spinning, and your synchro's are going to get chewed up.

You can have your clutch system bled at any competent mechanics. That is cheap, replacing your tranny, or having it rebuilt is expensive.

So get this done now, to safe money in the future.
 
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