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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For those of you who were lucky enough to get in on the bulk buy along with myself, here is a tip I learned from Grassroots Motorspoorts Magazine for removing the old bushings from the four rear suspension bars.
With about a 3/16th" drill bit in a drill motor, drill into the rubber bushing at the outer edge of the bushing near the steel all the way thru the bushing. Keep the bit spinning and it will pull itself around the circumference of the bushing. You can help it along by pushing it also. It chews the rubber up as you go around and then you can pop it out easily with a hammer. I tried it on an extra trailing arm I have and it worked great. Lot less mess than torching them out. I did notice that there is a steel tab on one side of the bushing that you have to work around. I don't know if all four bar ends have this or not. Gavin could shed some light on this.
 

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Saw that article also, but only after I had finished mine. Its a pretty cool idea. Do I feel that things would have been better if I had done things that way? Not really. Torching the bushings was surprisingly painless. It does require you to buy a torch however, so score one for the drill technique.

Ok. This trick will only work with the rear links. The two rear trailing links would be a prime candidate for this method as they are all rubber. The four lateral links may be an issue. The bushings(although hollow and rubber) are reinforced with steel inserts. Not sure how effective this method would be with it. It may still work, but I havent tried it.

As it turned out it was a good thing for me that I had torched out the bushings because I needed the stock center tubes for all four lateral links. The crush tubes that were included with the Noltecs were a softish metal and got deformed when I torqued down on them. All four were destroyed. I quickly fished out the stock items, cleaned them up and even thought they were a tight fit(they were thicker than the tubes noltec included) got things moving in the right direction again.

Gavin
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gavin do all the stock bolts and washers work with the poly bushings? Maybe the steel inserts on the SuperPro bushing will be as thick as the OEM ones.
 

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All the bolts and washers work with the bushing kits. I had no issues with fitment with the superpros in the front control arms. Went together like a snap. The crush tube that was included was fairly stout. I can only believe that the rears would be of the same quality.

One thing that may come up is the need to use washers as a "stop" for the bushings. The inside mounts of the lateral links bolt to a tube of sorts. This tube is about the same size as the crush tubes. The stock bushings are glued into the links so they cant move. The polyurethane bushings arent. So theres nothing to stop them from sliding further down on the mounting tubes. I used washers between the mounts and the crush tubes as a stopper to prevent that from happening. If you do have to do this, make sure you get metric washers and get thin ones or the whole assembly will be difficult to bolt down because of lack of threads.

Gavin
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gavin is correct the drilling will only work on the longer trailing links and not the toe adjustment links. The rubber on those is so narrow I had to use a 3/32" bit and it wouldn't pull itself around the bushing even if I tried forcing it.
 

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Shame that didnt work out. But there is the ability to torch them out. A torch kit is only 10-12$ at orchard supply and it really isnt as hard as you might think. Just remember to stay upwind.

Gavin
 

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OR you could do it like i did

pick a piece of wood i had lying around, soak half of it with some gasoline light it up and put the old bushings to burn away, kinda like when you do marshamallows at a camp fire...

it took around 20-30 minutes to burn all of the bushings off

:D


guetto but work and its cheaper to do.

:D :p
 

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gavin said:
Scared of you :lol:, But hey, it did work. As long as you are safe about it(bucket of water, working in an area where nothing is combustable, etc)

Gavin
:p

true i had the piece of wood in between three bricks to make kinda like an old fashioned oven and layed the ends of the suspension parts on top of the fire and they began to melt within 5 minutes or so, it took me around 20 minutes for everything since i had to switch the ends of the rods to burn all of the bushings, oh yeah i had a hose to put out any unwanted flames

btw remember to aim at the base of a fire not at the flames themselves.

;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The drilling isn't such a great idea after all since you still have to heat it up to get out the remains of the bushings. Real difficult to cut out the little bits left after drilling.
 

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you know I was going to drill, or use a jig saw with a mild blade but the torch was just so easy. I just got an F for environmental effort this week. But my car is nice and tight, good trade. Harbor freight was having a 1/2 price on that nice italian made propane torch with the push button start last week too. Total price of torch: $15 with 2 tanks of propane from Fred Meyer (only needed one though).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was afraid of making huge clouds of noxious smoke but it doesn't take much heat so it was more like small wisps of smoke.
 
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