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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guyz,

I've got a big favor to ask. If any of you will be working under your car, can you please take a picture/s of where the bottom hose of the vapor canister connects to? Mine is disconnected and people can smell fuel whenever i drive by hahah! :O

Btw, I do have a haynes manual. But, it doesn't say where the bottom hose of the vapor canister connects.


Thanks Guyz
~ Tim
 

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Is this the black plastic charcoal canister? On the mx3 the bottom hose connects to nothing/to atmosphere, it is slashed at a 30 deg angle. The air is meant to be fine by that stage. Bit odd about the smell though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yeah the charcoal canister. On mx6 i think it's supposed to connect to something, but the plastic connector on mine was broken so it got disconnected. I've bought a replacement but couldn't figure out where it goes xD!!
 

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Is this the black plastic charcoal canister? On the mx3 the bottom hose connects to nothing/to atmosphere, it is slashed at a 30 deg angle. The air is meant to be fine by that stage. Bit odd about the smell though!
I was unaware that that the canister actually purified the air. I thought it sucked in air along with the vapors it had stored, and sent it to the IM to be burned up
 

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my bad, let me clarify with a quote :)

The function of the fuel evaporative control system is to trap and store evaporative emissions from the gas tank and carburetor. A charcoal canister is used to trap the fuel vapors. The fuel vapors adhere to the charcoal, until the engine is started, and engine vacuum can be used to draw the vapors into the engine, so that they can be burned along with the fuel/air mixture. This system requires the use of a sealed gas tank filler cap. This cap is so important to the operation of the system, that a test of the cap is now being integrated into many state emission inspection programs. Pre-1970 cars released fuel vapors into the atmosphere through the use of a vented gas cap. Today with the use of sealed caps, redesigned gas tanks are used. The tank has to have the space for the vapors to collect so that they can then be vented to the charcoal canister. A purge valve is used to control the vapor flow into the engine. The purge valve is operated by engine vacuum. One common problem with this system is that the purge valve goes bad and engine vacuum draws fuel directly into the intake system. This enriches the fuel mixture and will foul the spark plugs. Most charcoal canisters have a filter that should be replaced periodically. This system should be checked when fuel mileage drops.
 
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