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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well most people are aware of how most short throw shifters work, they increase the distance between the pivot ball of the shifter and the fork of the shifter that the shift linkage bolts to, and since the ball remains in the same positon, the linkage is forced lower, at an angle, creating uneeded forces in uneeded directions on the shifter on the transmission itself.

that is just my point, the ball remains in the same position...however if you've ever taken your shifter assembly apart you'll notice that theres a a cylinder which the shifter bushings sit in, in order of: Lower ball bushing, shifter, upper ball bushing, and a retaining spring. Some similar cars(2nd gen, escorts/protege) dont have a retaining spring that works in the same fashion, they use a snap ring. By removing the spring on a stock shifter you get about an inch more movement inside this shifter cylinder. If one were to make a plastic spacer out of plastic, or use part of another cars shift linkage in place of this spring(using a snap ring to keep it together) and move the pivot ball up an inch, you can leave the bottom fork of the shifter in the same spot and receive the same short throw shifter effect.

Instead of lowering the bottom of the shifter, you raise the pivoting point. I know an inch isnt that much, but say you combine that inch with the 1-2 inches that the pacesetter shifter, for example, is shorter, thats 2-3 inches shorter(not shorter throw, just shorter from bottom of shifter to top). Compared to the modified stock short shifter where you lose all the shifter height above the pivoting point(which yes, it STILL is a shorter throw), you spread the amount the shifter is shorter then a stock one on both ends of the pivot ball. Doing this wouldnt cause as much strain on the shifter on the transmission, or the shiftgate...it'd be a safe short throw shifter. if one were inclined enough to weld they could even get more then an inch, by cutting off the top of that cylinder and extending it to their desired amount.

I've found a spacer that just might work, from a different shift linkage. I'm going to try this and see how it works... in theory it should do just dandy.

the sad part is that i thought most of this up while in class... not that its some all new breakthrough idea but that my teachers are that boring lol
-Eric
 
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